multeity

multeity

(mʌlˈtiːɪtɪ)
n
manifoldness
[C19: from Latin multus many, perhaps formed by analogy with haecceity]
References in periodicals archive ?
Literary and Rhetorical Genre Epic Dramatic Work Song Play Reader Language Author position Creative Dictation Creation process Trope Metaphor Irony Sound scheme Alliteration Pararhyme Grouping Fall Rise Meter Tetrameter Free Divisioning Stanzaic Arranged Prolongation Extensional Fragmentary Syntactic Anaphora Symploce scheme Discourse Paratactic Dialectical Semiotic Iconic Symbolic relation Structure Repetition Network Position Initial Peripheral Figuration Opposition Multeity Contrast Difference Pattern Concentric Multidimensional Process Repetitive Static Proleptic Anticlimactic Contradictory Open Fixed Undirected IV.
One of the many attempts to inaugurate the spirit's descent even begins from matter: "Darkness; materia prima, indistinction in actu, multeity in posse = the faces of the waters" (15:389).
It functions today as a microcosm of the sciences, with a multeity seldom found within one institution.
For this notion Swinburne was, as Peters recognized, indebted to Coleridge, who had delivered a lecture in 1818 in which he announced his now-proverbial theory of the imagination as an assimilative power that found "unity in multeity.
Smith sees the multeity of contemporary art as a reflection of this world of temporalities but also, and more profoundly, as a rumination on what it means to live in a globalized, postcolonial constellation that has moved beyond traditional divisions of era or epoch, modernism or postmodernism.
similar to general romantic notions of the relationship of unity in multeity [.
I propose that we celebrate this very multeity as our curious, multiform strength, its amplitude reinforcing and invigorating our work.
Even here Coleridge makes little attempt to excuse his francophobia, and to the modern reader his most important notions, such as the imagination, unity in multeity, and the clerisy, possess a monumental force when conveyed in Wordsworthian or neo-Kantian terms but seem oddly fragile when raised on the backs of paltry French alternatives.
As a poet who has "prized / multeity and difference down to the mold under the leaf" (S 123), Ammons hopes to accommodate all that the eye can see.
The green man is green because he belongs to the colorful house and grounds which we look at through the viewing grid of the draughtsman as he seeks to reduce their rich multeity into black and white squares.
Unlikeness not only implies chaos; in fact it would seem that Graham wishes her poems to attain to a condition of unlikeness - what Coleridge called multeity in unity, what the ecologists call climax, what Heidegger called "The Open," what Blake called organized innocence - a place of conflicting energy sources all asserting themselves and creating a kind of accord out of conflict.
Attuned to contradiction and multeity, he could blend youthful insouciance with Blougram's mature sophistry.