vaccine

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vac·cine

 (văk-sēn′, văk′sēn′)
n.
1.
a. A preparation of a weakened or killed pathogen, such as a bacterium or virus, or of a portion of the pathogen's structure, that is administered to prevent or treat infection by the pathogen and that functions by stimulating the production of an immune response.
b. A preparation from the cowpox virus that protects against smallpox when administered to an individual.
2. Computers A software program designed to detect and stop the progress of computer viruses.

[From Latin vaccīnus, of cows, from vacca, cow.]

vaccine

(ˈvæksiːn)
n
1. (Medicine) a suspension of dead, attenuated, or otherwise modified microorganisms (viruses, bacteria, or rickettsiae) for inoculation to produce immunity to a disease by stimulating the production of antibodies
2. (Medicine) (originally) a preparation of the virus of cowpox taken from infected cows and inoculated in humans to produce immunity to smallpox
3. (Medicine) (modifier) of or relating to vaccination or vaccinia
4. (Computer Science) computing a piece of software designed to detect and remove computer viruses from a system
[C18: from New Latin variolae vaccīnae cowpox, title of medical treatise (1798) by Edward Jenner, from Latin vacca a cow]

vac•cine

(vækˈsin; esp. Brit. ˈvæk sin)

n.
1. any preparation of weakened or killed bacteria or viruses introduced into the body to prevent a disease by stimulating antibodies against it.
2. the virus of cowpox, used in vaccination, obtained from pox vesicles of a cow or person.
3. a software program that helps to protect against computer viruses.
[1800–05; < New Latin (variolae)vaccīnae cowpox =vacc(a) cow + -īnae, feminine pl. of -īnus -ine1]

vac·cine

(văk-sēn′)
A substance that stimulates cells in the immune system to recognize and attack disease-causing agents, especially through the production of antibodies. Most vaccines are given by injection or are swallowed as liquids. Vaccines may contain a weaker form of the disease-causing virus or bacterium or even a DNA fragment or some other component of the agent. See Note at Jenner.
Did You Know? In the 1950s, polio epidemics left thousands of children with permanent physical disabilities. Today, kids are given a polio vaccine to keep them from catching the virus. That vaccine, like most others, works by stimulating the body's immune system to produce antibodies—substances that defend the body against infection by recognizing and destroying disease-causing agents like viruses and bacteria. Scientists usually prepare vaccines by taking a sample of the disease-causing agent and weakening it with heat or chemicals. That way, the agent loses its ability to cause serious illness but is still able to stimulate the body to produce antibodies and provide immunity. But finding safe vaccines that are also effective is a challenge. Today, scientists are able to change the structure of viruses and bacteria at the level of their DNA. They remove the most harmful fragments of DNA and then use what is left in vaccines. New vaccines containing harmless bits of DNA from disease-causing germs have also been developed—all to make diseases like polio a thing of the past.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vaccine - immunogen consisting of a suspension of weakened or dead pathogenic cells injected in order to stimulate the production of antibodiesvaccine - immunogen consisting of a suspension of weakened or dead pathogenic cells injected in order to stimulate the production of antibodies
DPT vaccine - abbreviation for combination vaccine against diphtheria and pertussis (whooping cough) and tetanus toxoids; usually given in a series of injections in early childhood
immunizing agent, immunogen - any substance or organism that provokes an immune response (produces immunity) when introduced into the body
pneumococcal vaccine, Pneumovax - vaccine (trade name Pneumovax) effective against the 23 most common strains of pneumococcus
poliovirus vaccine - vaccine prepared from poliovirus to provide immunity to poliomyelitis
proteosome, proteosome vaccine - a form of vaccine that can be administered by an inhaler

vaccine

noun inoculation, injection, immunization Anti-malarial vaccines are now undergoing trials.
Translations
لُقاح، طُعْم
očkovací látkavakcína
vaccine
oltóanyag
bóluefni
ワクチン疫苗
vakcina
vakcīna
očkovacia látka
vaccin

vaccine

[ˈvæksiːn] Nvacuna f

vaccine

[ˈvæksiːn] nvaccin m
the rabies vaccine → le vaccin contre la rage

vaccine

nImpfstoff m, → Vakzine f (spec)

vaccine

[ˈvæksiːn] nvaccino
polio vaccine → vaccino antipolio

vaccine

(ˈvӕksiːn) noun
a substance made from the germs that cause a particular disease, especially smallpox, and given to a person or animal to prevent him from catching that disease.
ˈvaccinate (-ksi-) verb
to protect (a person etc) against a disease by putting vaccine into his blood. Has your child been vaccinated against smallpox?
ˌvacciˈnation (-ksi-) noun
(an) act of vaccinating or process of being vaccinated. I'm to have a vaccination tomorrow; Vaccination was introduced in the eighteenth century.

vac·cine

n. vacuna, preparación de microorganismos atenuados o muertos que se introduce en el cuerpo para establecer una inmunidad en contra de la enfermedad específica causada por dichos microorganismos;
BCG ______ del bacilo Calmette-Guérin, contra la tuberculosis;
chickenpox ______ contra la varicela;
DTP (diptheria, tetanus, pertussis) ______ triple contra la difteria, tétano y pertusis (tos ferina);
hepatitis A ______ contra la hepatitis A;
hepatitis B ______ contra la hepatitis B;
influenza ______ contra la influenza;
measles virus, inactivated ______ antisarampión, inactivada;
measles virus, live attenuated ______ antisarampión de virus vivo, atenuada;
pneumococcal polyvalent ______ antineumocócica polivalente;
pneumovax ______ neumocócica polisacárida;
poliovirus, live oral trivalent ______ antipolio trivalente o de Sabin;
rabies ______ antirrábica;
Salk's antipoliomyelitis ______ antipoliomielítica de Salk;
smallpox ______ antivariolosa, antivariólica;
tetanus ______ contra el tétano;
typhus ______ antitífica;
typhoid ______ contra la tifoidea;
___ reactionreacción a la ___.

vaccine

n vacuna; attenuated — vacuna atenuada; BCG — vacuna BCG; conjugated — vacuna conjugada; diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis (DTP) — vacuna contra (la) difteria, (el) tétanos y (la) tos ferina, vacuna DTP; flu — vacuna antigripal (form), vacuna contra la influenza or gripe; Haemophilus influenzae type b — vacuna contra (el) Haemophilus influenzae tipo b; hepatitis B — vacuna contra la hepatitis B; inactivated — vacuna inactivada; influenza — V. flu — arriba; live — vacuna viva; meningococcal — vacuna meningocócica, vacuna contra la meningitis meningocócica; measles,mumps, and rubella (MMR) — vacuna triple viral; vacuna contra el sarampión, las paperas y la rubéola; oral polio — vacuna antipoliomielítica oral, vacuna oral contra la polio; pneumococcal — vacuna neumocócica, vacuna contra la neumonía; rabies — vacuna contra la rabia; Sabin — vacuna Sabin; Salk — vacuna Salk; smallpox — vacuna contra la viruela; tetanusdiphtheria (Td) — vacuna contra (el) tétanos y (la) difteria, vacuna Td; tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap) — vacuna contra (la) difteria, (el) tétanos y (la) tos ferina (DTP), vacuna contra el tétanos, la difteria y la tos ferina (Ang), vacuna Tdap (Ang) (el componente contra la tos ferina siendo acelular en las traducciones antecedentes); varicella — vacuna contra la varicela
References in periodicals archive ?
Drug profiles covered in this mumps pipeline research are Cell Therapy for Measles, Mumps and Rubella, measles + mumps + rubella + varicella vaccine, measles + mumps + rubella vaccine, measles[strain schwarz] + mumps[strain RIT 4385] + rubella[strain wistar RA 27/3] vaccine and mumps vaccine.
A single dose and 2 doses of the mumps vaccine confer long-term protection in only 64% and 88%, respectively, of those vaccinated.
Mumps vaccine effectiveness in primary schools and households, the Netherlands, 2008.
The Directorate of Public Health announced that it had supplied people in 'li with two doses of mumps vaccine in a precautionary measure to protect the community from diseases.
Admissions to unaffected areas of the facility were permitted for inmates who had previous mumps infection or had received 2 doses of mumps vaccine at least 2 weeks prior to admission.
Can cause anaphylactic reaction to previous mumps vaccine, eggs, or neomycin.
11 Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report, a study of the outbreak noted that the mumps vaccine has "greatly reduced the burden of disease in the United States from 186,000 reported cases in 1967 to fewer than 500 per year in the early 2000s.
PARENTS have been left without an alternative to the MMR jag after a drug firm stopped making the world's only mumps vaccine.
There would be no MMR combination shot (which includes the measles, mumps and Rubella vaccines all in one); just a mumps vaccine on this visit - the others would come later, or so I thought.
He said: "There is no separate mumps vaccine in the UK, they have run out and are not importing any more, and she has got to start school in September.
Apart from the logistics of there being no licensed single measles or mumps vaccine available in the UK, to have done so would have damaged confidence in MMR further.
When this issue was first raised last year, it was predicted that as supplies of the single mumps vaccine ran low, those formerly anti-MMR would accept the triple vaccine.