mural

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mu·ral

 (myo͝or′əl)
n.
A very large image, such as a painting or enlarged photograph, applied directly to a wall or ceiling.
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or resembling a wall.
2. Painted on or applied to a wall.

[Middle English, of a wall, from Old French, from Latin mūrālis, from mūrus, wall.]

mu′ral·ist n.

mural

(ˈmjʊərəl)
n
(Art Terms) a large painting or picture on a wall
adj
(Building) of or relating to a wall
[C15: from Latin mūrālis, from mūrus wall]
ˈmuralist n

mu•ral

(ˈmyʊər əl)

n.
1. a large picture painted directly on a wall or ceiling.
2. a greatly enlarged photograph attached directly to a wall.
adj.
3. of, pertaining to, or like a wall.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin mūrālis=mūr(us) wall + -ālis -al1]
mu′ral•ist, n.

mural

A painting or decoration applied to a wall, usually executed in oil, fresco, or tempera.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mural - a painting that is applied to a wall surfacemural - a painting that is applied to a wall surface
fresco - a mural done with watercolors on wet plaster
painting, picture - graphic art consisting of an artistic composition made by applying paints to a surface; "a small painting by Picasso"; "he bought the painting as an investment"; "his pictures hang in the Louvre"
Adj.1.mural - of or relating to walls; "mural painting"
Translations
رَسْمَه جِداريَّه
nástěnný
vægmaleri
falfestmény
veggmálverk
sienas gleznojums
nástenný
duvar resmi

mural

[ˈmjʊərəl]
A. ADJmural
B. Nmural m, pintura f mural

mural

[ˈmjʊərəl] npeinture f murale

mural

nWandgemälde nt
adjWand-; mural paintingWandmalerei f

mural

[ˈmjʊərl]
1. adjmurale

mural

(ˈmjuərəl) noun
a painting that is painted directly on to a wall.

mu·ral

a. mural, rel. a las paredes de un órgano o parte.
References in periodicals archive ?
The photograph correlates public art and museum painting, and contrasts aesthetic value of academic painting, muralism, and working-class hairstyles.
The result shows a collaborative process where these artists pose questions related to urban development, which are then responded to through their installations, photography, street art, muralism, and soundscapes.
MURALISM - A SIGN OF THE TIMES A PIONEER of the post-revolution muralist movement emerging from the ashes of the Diaz dictatorship which ended in 1920, Frida's husband Diego Rivera was responsible for some of the city's greatest public artworks - enormous murals depicting the history of Mexico, always with a political message.
Thus Tercerunquinto--the artists Gabriel Cazares and Rolando Flores--repurposed damaged slabs of blank, grayish stone taken from the site's main esplanade into a somber "mural." Here, in contrast to the celebratory identity politics nurtured in the muralism of the 1950s, mourning and loss become the core of what currently binds Mexicans as a people.
Drawing parallels between Mexican political paintings and muralism, the Mexican collective Tercerunquinto will be live-painting campaign murals at the Proyectos Monclova booth, accompanied by a video that highlights the mediums' visual and conceptual links.
The editor has organized the sixty-five selections that make up the main body of the text in twelve parts devoted to early modernism, the avant-garde of the 1920s, politically committed muralism and indigenism, surrealism and related modes, constructive and informalist abstraction, and a wide variety of other related subjects.
In Latin America, modernism movements that gained momentum of their own include muralism in Mexico, concrete art in Buenos Aires and surrealism all over Central and South America.
When I came to Canada, I started working at Reception House, and I could clearly see all the challenges that a social agency has in the community, trying to address different problems, so I thought muralism and the arts are tools to advocate--friendly, and everyone can participate.
the painted walls are for the younger generation, a place of political contestation, but also of expression and dialogue about ideas of identity and culture, justice and reconciliation, following a global tradition of "muralism" as a form of socio-political protest.
Key words: muralism, painter, women, indigenism, technique
McCaughan, however, demonstrates the innovative ways in which Chicano/a artists negotiated and reworked a range of influences: Mexican muralism, European modernism, and contemporary art in the United States, not to mention popular culture.
She discusses the murals and their effect on the community in her book If These Walls Could Talk: Community Muralism and the Beauty of Justice (Liturgical Press).