murderabilia


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murderabilia

pl n
objects that are regarded as valuable because of their connection with murders or other notorious crimes
[murder + (memora)bilia]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mina's book The Long Drop beat competition from the likes of Val McDermid's Out of Bounds and Murderabilia by Craig Robertson.
It's also the reason he peddles a product many consider ghoulish and off limits - murderabilia.
the retired mortician who sells Murderabilia is ("funny as hell").
Crime has become a business, said Andy Kahan, director of the Crime Victims' Division in Houston's Office of the Mayor, during a workshop titled "The Myths of the Son-of-Sam Laws, Notoriety for Profit and Murderabilia.
Suna Chang, The Prodigal "Son" Returns: An Assessment of Current "Son of Sam" Laws and the Reality of the Online Murderabilia Marketplace, 31 RUTGERS COMPUTER & TECH.
Recent emails have included the words Yuma 'In Cuba, a nickname for the United States,' smitty 'a type of automobile muffler known for its (powerful or resonant) sound,' noodle 'to hunt bare-handed in water for fish or turtles,' sousveillance 'the watching of the watchers by the watched; countersurveillance by people not in positions of power or authority,' zhingzhong 'merchandise made in Asia; cheaply made, inexpensive, or substandard goods,' and murderabilia 'collectibles from, by, or about murders, murderers, or violent crimes.
Craig Robertson - Murderabilia (Simon & Schuster) "An intriguing premise in a contemporary setting which tiptoes along the darker edges of crime fiction with an unusual detective at its heart.
From a business perspective at least, this virtual murderabilia marketplace serves as a striking display of both entrepreneurial spirit and mass consumerism in cyberspace.
EXHAUSTED: Battered firemen rest; BRAVERY: Mike Kehoe fights his way into the building; SICK: A hawker sells mementos - murderabilia - of the 9/11 attack; SORROW: Firemen with the body of NYFD Chaplain Mychal Judge
The letter was acquired by best-selling Scots crime novelist Craig Robertson, who used it as the basis for research on his latest novel, Murderabilia.