murphy

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Mur·phy

 (mûr′fē)
n. pl. Mur·phies Slang
1. A Murphy game.
2. or murphy A potato.

[From Murphy, a common Irish name.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

murphy

(ˈmɜːfɪ)
n, pl -phies
(Plants) a dialect or informal word for potato
[C19: from the common Irish surname Murphy]

Murphy

(ˈmɜːfɪ)
n
1. (Biography) Alex. born 1939, English rugby league player and coach; scored 16 tries in 27 test matches for Great Britain (1958–71)
2. (Biography) Eddie, full name Edward Regan Murphy. born 1951, US film actor and comedian. His films include 48 Hours (1982), Beverly Hills Cop (1984), Coming to America (1988), Dr Dolittle (1998), and, as a voice artist, the Shrek series of animated films (2001–10)
3. (Biography) William Parry. 1892–1987, US physician: with G. R. Minot, he discovered the liver treatment for anaemia and they shared, with G. H. Whipple, the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1934
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Murphy - an edible tuber native to South Americamurphy - an edible tuber native to South America; a staple food of Ireland
starches - foodstuff rich in natural starch (especially potatoes, rice, bread)
solanaceous vegetable - any of several fruits of plants of the family Solanaceae; especially of the genera Solanum, Capsicum, and Lycopersicon
root vegetable - any of various fleshy edible underground roots or tubers
baked potato - potato that has been cooked by baking it in an oven
chips, french fries, french-fried potatoes, fries - strips of potato fried in deep fat
home fries, home-fried potatoes - sliced pieces of potato fried in a pan until brown and crisp
jacket - the outer skin of a potato
mashed potato - potato that has been peeled and boiled and then mashed
Uruguay potato - similar to the common potato
Solanum tuberosum, white potato, white potato vine, potato - annual native to South America having underground stolons bearing edible starchy tubers; widely cultivated as a garden vegetable; vines are poisonous
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Murphy

[ˈmɜːfɪ] N Murphy's lawley f de la indefectible mala voluntad de los objetos inanimados
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Latvian-born psychology student at Swansea University was a popular member of staff at the city's Jack Murphys bar.
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Last June the video was posted on Facebook of a mystery man downing a pint, then belting out Nessun Dorma in Jack Murphys bar on Wind Street.
A statement from American punk band Dropkick Murphys posted on Twitter said: "We are deeply saddened to have heard the news of the passing of Malcolm Young from AC/DC.
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Back then Neill said: "The Murphys and Maddison will not be going out on loan.
SUNDAY THE ANTARCTIC MONKEYS: Ku Bar, Stockton 9pm THE WILD MURPHYS: Storytellers, Stockton 9pm GOOD MUSIC CLUB FEAT ANDY JOHNSON AND ELLIS RAYNER: The Masham, Hartburn, 7.30pm, free ?
In an author's note at the end of Villa America (Hachette Audio, $30, 14 hours, ISBN 9781611130591), Liza Klaussmann comments that writing about real people is a "tricky business." But when done well, this kind of historical fiction can have compelling appeal, which is certainly the case with her wonderfully textured account of the lives of Sara and Gerald Murphy. In the 1920s, the Murphys lived a golden life with their three young children, surrounded by artists and writers like Picasso, Fitzgerald and Hemingway, in their fabulous villa on the Riviera.