cramp

(redirected from Muscle cramps)
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Related to Muscle cramps: Muscle spasms, Muscle pain, Leg cramps

cramp 1

 (krămp)
n.
1. An involuntary, spasmodic muscle contraction causing severe pain.
2. A temporary partial paralysis of habitually or excessively used muscles.
3. cramps Spasmodic contractions of the uterus, such as those occurring during menstruation or labor, usually causing pain in the abdomen that may radiate to the lower back and thighs.
v. cramped, cramp·ing, cramps
v.tr.
To affect with or as if with a cramp.
v.intr.
To suffer from or experience cramps.

[Middle English crampe, from Old French, of Germanic origin.]

cramp 2

 (krămp)
n.
1. A frame with an adjustable part to hold pieces together; a clamp.
2. A cramp iron.
3. A compressing or restraining force, influence, or thing.
4. A confined position or part.
tr.v. cramped, cramp·ing, cramps
1. To hold together with a cramp.
2. To shut in so closely as to restrict the physical freedom of: were cramped in the tiny cubicle.
3.
a. To steer (the wheels of a vehicle) to make a turn.
b. To jam (a wheel) by a short turn.
adj.
Cramped.
Idiom:
cramp (one's) style
To restrict or prevent from free action or expression.

[Middle English crampe, probably from Middle Dutch, hook, cramp. Adj., probably akin to Icelandic krappr, constrained, tight, and Old High German cramf, squeezed.]

cramp

(kræmp)
n
1. (Pathology) a painful involuntary contraction of a muscle, typically caused by overexertion, heat, or chill
2. (Pathology) temporary partial paralysis of a muscle group: writer's cramp.
3. (Pathology) (usually plural in the US and Canada) severe abdominal pain
vb
(Pathology) (tr) to affect with or as if with a cramp
[C14: from Old French crampe, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German krampho]

cramp

(kræmp)
n
1. (Tools) Also called: cramp iron a strip of metal with its ends bent at right angles, used to bind masonry
2. (Tools) a device for holding pieces of wood while they are glued; clamp
3. something that confines or restricts
4. a confined state or position
vb (tr)
5. (Tools) to secure or hold with a cramp
6. to confine, hamper, or restrict
7. cramp someone's style informal to prevent a person from using his abilities or acting freely and confidently
[C15: from Middle Dutch crampe cramp, hook, of Germanic origin; compare Old High German khramph bent; see cramp1]

cramp1

(kræmp)

n.
1. Often, cramps.
a. an involuntary, usu. painful contraction or spasm of a muscle or muscles.
b. a painful contraction of involuntary muscle in the wall of the abdomen, uterus, or other organ.
v.t.
3. to affect with or as if with a cramp.
[1325–75; Middle English crampe < Old French < Germanic; compare Old Saxon krampo, Old High German krampfo cramp]

cramp2

(kræmp)

n.
1. a metal bar with bent ends for holding together building stones or for fastening them to a steel or concrete beam.
2. a portable frame or tool with a movable part that can be screwed up to hold things together; clamp.
3. anything that confines or restrains.
4. a cramped state or part.
v.t.
5. to fasten or hold with a cramp.
6. to restrict or hamper.
7. to steer (the wheels of a vehicle) in order to make a turn.
Idioms:
cramp one's style, to prevent one from showing one's best abilities.
[1375–1425; late Middle English crampe < Middle Dutch: hook. See cramp1]

cramp


Past participle: cramped
Gerund: cramping

Imperative
cramp
cramp
Present
I cramp
you cramp
he/she/it cramps
we cramp
you cramp
they cramp
Preterite
I cramped
you cramped
he/she/it cramped
we cramped
you cramped
they cramped
Present Continuous
I am cramping
you are cramping
he/she/it is cramping
we are cramping
you are cramping
they are cramping
Present Perfect
I have cramped
you have cramped
he/she/it has cramped
we have cramped
you have cramped
they have cramped
Past Continuous
I was cramping
you were cramping
he/she/it was cramping
we were cramping
you were cramping
they were cramping
Past Perfect
I had cramped
you had cramped
he/she/it had cramped
we had cramped
you had cramped
they had cramped
Future
I will cramp
you will cramp
he/she/it will cramp
we will cramp
you will cramp
they will cramp
Future Perfect
I will have cramped
you will have cramped
he/she/it will have cramped
we will have cramped
you will have cramped
they will have cramped
Future Continuous
I will be cramping
you will be cramping
he/she/it will be cramping
we will be cramping
you will be cramping
they will be cramping
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been cramping
you have been cramping
he/she/it has been cramping
we have been cramping
you have been cramping
they have been cramping
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been cramping
you will have been cramping
he/she/it will have been cramping
we will have been cramping
you will have been cramping
they will have been cramping
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been cramping
you had been cramping
he/she/it had been cramping
we had been cramping
you had been cramping
they had been cramping
Conditional
I would cramp
you would cramp
he/she/it would cramp
we would cramp
you would cramp
they would cramp
Past Conditional
I would have cramped
you would have cramped
he/she/it would have cramped
we would have cramped
you would have cramped
they would have cramped

cramp

A painful involuntary muscle spasm, which may result from loss of salt owing to excessive sweating or from deficient blood supply to the affected area.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cramp - a painful and involuntary muscular contractioncramp - a painful and involuntary muscular contraction
symptom - (medicine) any sensation or change in bodily function that is experienced by a patient and is associated with a particular disease
charley horse, charley-horse - a muscular cramp (especially in the thigh or calf) following vigorous exercise
graphospasm, writer's cramp - muscular spasms of thumb and forefinger while writing with a pen or pencil
blepharospasm - spasm of the eyelid muscle resulting in closure of the eye
crick, kink, rick, wrick - a painful muscle spasm especially in the neck or back (`rick' and `wrick' are British)
myoclonus - a clonic spasm of a muscle or muscle group
twitch, twitching, vellication - a sudden muscle spasm; especially one caused by a nervous condition
tenesmus - painful spasm of the anal sphincter along with an urgent desire to defecate without the significant production of feces; associated with irritable bowel syndrome
trismus - prolonged spasm of the jaw muscles
2.cramp - a clamp for holding pieces of wood together while they are glued
clamp, clinch - a device (generally used by carpenters) that holds things firmly together
3.cramp - a strip of metal with ends bent at right anglescramp - a strip of metal with ends bent at right angles; used to hold masonry together
strip, slip - artifact consisting of a narrow flat piece of material
Verb1.cramp - secure with a cramp; "cramp the wood"
fasten, fix, secure - cause to be firmly attached; "fasten the lock onto the door"; "she fixed her gaze on the man"
2.cramp - prevent the progress or free movement of; "He was hampered in his efforts by the bad weather"; "the imperialist nation wanted to strangle the free trade between the two small countries"
confine, limit, throttle, trammel, restrain, restrict, bound - place limits on (extent or access); "restrict the use of this parking lot"; "limit the time you can spend with your friends"
3.cramp - affect with or as if with a cramp
affect - act physically on; have an effect upon; "the medicine affects my heart rate"
4.cramp - suffer from sudden painful contraction of a muscle
suffer, sustain, have, get - undergo (as of injuries and illnesses); "She suffered a fracture in the accident"; "He had an insulin shock after eating three candy bars"; "She got a bruise on her leg"; "He got his arm broken in the scuffle"

cramp

1
noun spasm, pain, ache, contraction, pang, stiffness, stitch, convulsion, twinge, crick, shooting pain She started getting stomach cramps this morning.

cramp

2
verb restrict, hamper, inhibit, hinder, check, handicap, confine, hamstring, constrain, obstruct, impede, shackle, circumscribe, encumber Like more and more women, she believes wedlock would cramp her style.

cramp 1

noun
A violent, excruciating seizure of pain:

cramp 2

nounverb
To check the freedom and spontaneity of:
Translations
تَشَنُّجيَحْشو، يُدْخِل في مكان ضَيّقيُعيقُ، يُقَيِّدُ
křečnacpatochromitstěsnat
krampelægge en dæmper på
kiinnittääkramppilihaskramppipuristinsuonenveto
bénítgátolgörcsgörcsöl
krampiòvinga, troîatakmarka
ankštai patalpintiribotispazmas
ierobežotiespiestkavētkrampjisaspiest
engellemekkrampsıkıştırmak

cramp

1 [kræmp]
A. N (Med) → calambre m
writer's crampcalambre m en las manos (por escribir mucho)
B. VT (= restrict) [+ development] → poner obstáculos a, poner trabas a
to cramp sb's stylecortar las alas a algn

cramp

2 [kræmp] N (Tech) → grapa f (Archit) → pieza f de unión, abrazadera f

cramp

[ˈkræmp]
n (= pain) → crampe f
vt
to cramp sb's style → priver qn de ses moyens

cramp

1
n (Med) → Krampf m; to have cramp in one’s legeinen Krampf im Bein haben; to have the cramps (US) → Krämpfe haben
vt
(also cramp up) personszusammenpferchen, einpferchen; writingeng zusammenkritzeln
(fig: = hinder) → behindern; to cramp somebody’s stylejdm im Weg sein
(= give cramp to)Krämpfe plverursachen in (+dat)

cramp

2
n (also cramp iron)Bauklammer f
vtklammern

cramp

[kræmp]
1. n (Med) cramp (in)crampo (a)
2. vt (hinder, person) → impacciare, inibire; (progress) → ostacolare, frenare
your presence is cramping my style (fam) → la tua presenza mi inibisce

cramp

(krӕmp) noun
(a) painful stiffening of the muscles. The swimmer got cramp and drowned.
verb
1. to put into too small a space. We were all cramped together in a tiny room.
2. to restrict; Lack of money cramped our efforts.

cramp

n. calambre, espasmo, entumecimiento; contracción dolorosa de un músculo.

cramp

n calambre m, (en el abdomen), retortijón or retorcijón m (frec. pl), cólico (frec. pl); menstrual cramps cólicos menstruales, dolores mpl menstruales (fam); postpartum cramps entuertos, contracciones bruscas y dolorosas del útero que ocurren en los días posteriores al parto; vi My leg is cramping..Tengo un calambre en la pierna… I have cramping..Tengo calambres (retortijones, retorcijones, cólicos).
References in periodicals archive ?
But such is not the case when you are experiencing muscle cramps because of liver disease.
Other symptoms include aching, heavy legs, swollen feet and ankles, muscle cramps, colour changes in the lower leg.
One of them suffered muscle cramps. They are aged between 25 and 50 years.
Meanwhile, there were 335 minor cases considered as light wounds, sprains, muscle cramps, jellyfish stings, and dizziness.
Heat stroke can also cause fast breathing or a fast heartbeat, skin redness and warmth, vomiting or diarrhea, muscle cramps or weakness and headaches.
French radio station RMC Sport said the 78-year-old had a "crisis of tetany" (involuntary muscle cramps) as well as a fever, which resulted in him being kept in for observation.
I drink gallons of the stuff in the belief that it keeps at bay dreaded muscle cramps in my legs, which can be extremely discombobulating if trapped in an aeroplane or train or lying in bed half asleep.
Consumers are looking for more solutions for pain, notes Lombardo, adding that in an Avadim Health survey of over 200 drug channel pharmacists, 73% reported being frequently or very frequently asked for over-the-counter recommendations for muscle cramps and spasms or symptoms associated with restless legs syndrome.
Monitoring of blood pressure, temperature, pulse and history of palpitations, headache, nausea, vomiting, muscle cramps, fever, shivering, chest-pain, bleeding, fits, itching was recorded before and up till one hour post hemodialysis session.
To prevent muscle cramps, eat foods that are rich in calcium and magnesium, such as fruits, vegetables, dairy products and meat.
Meanwhile, concerned doctors say that children often complain of backaches and muscle cramps, which is due to prolonged hours of sitting in one posture.
MUSCLE CRAMPS CRAMPs are very common, especially if you're cold, but they can also be down to lack of magnesium.