musk turtle

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musk turtle

n.
Any of several small North and Central American freshwater turtles of the family Kinosternidae and especially the genus Sternotherus, which emit a strong-smelling secretion from musk glands when disturbed.

musk turtle

n
(Animals) any of several small turtles of the genus Sternotherus, esp S. odoratus (common musk turtle or stinkpot), that emit a strong unpleasant odour: family Kinosternidae

musk′ tur`tle


n.
any of several aquatic turtles of the genus Sternotherus, of North America, having a musky odor.
[1865–70, Amer.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.musk turtle - small freshwater turtle having a strong musky odormusk turtle - small freshwater turtle having a strong musky odor
mud turtle - bottom-dwelling freshwater turtle inhabiting muddy rivers of North America and Central America
References in periodicals archive ?
A test of philopatry by common musk turtles. American Midland Naturalist 156:45-51.
Also known as the stinkpot because of the musky odour they secrete when disturbed, musk turtles are a threatened species.
However, musk turtles lack cloacal bursae and their skin is relatively thick and lacks a well-developed capillary network, according to Heiss.
Response of common musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus) to intraspecific chemical cues.
Kelso, who serves as head archaeologist of the Jamestown Recovery Project, discloses the grim in situ and documentary evidence of those seasons of famine: desperately eaten dogs, cats, horses, musk turtles, rats and poisonous snakes.
In this study, the number of turtles captured per trap hour in the site that has historically held the densest population of flattened musk turtles compares favorably with a 1997 study and may indicate that the population is increasing in that area, though not to levels found in the 1981 or 1983 studies.
serpentina), musk turtles (Sternotherus odoratus), and painted turtles (Chrysemys picta marginata) were certainly present in the lagoons by Miller, now in northeast Gary, in the early part of this century, because they are documented by museum specimens.
Werle found two Sternotherus odoratus, or musk turtles, ("They're not rare but they're cool"), a lot of Elliptio complanata mussels (which are very common), a swimming garter snake and a few milk bottles from the 1940s.