Muskhogean

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Related to Muskogean languages: Muskhogean

Mus·kho·ge·an

 (mŭs-kō′gē-ən)
n.
Variant of Muskogean.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Muskhogean - a member of any of the peoples formerly living in southeastern United States and speaking Muskhogean languages
American Indian, Indian, Red Indian - a member of the race of people living in America when Europeans arrived
Alabama - a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in what is now the state of Alabama; "the Alabamas were members of the Creek Confederacy"
Choctaw - a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in Alabama
Hitchiti - a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in Georgia; a member of the Creek Confederacy
Koasati - a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in northern Alabama; a member of the Creek Confederacy
Muskogee - a member of the Muskhogean people formerly living in Georgia and eastern Alabama and constituting the core of the Creek Confederacy
Seminole - a member of the Muskhogean people who moved into Florida in the 18th century
2.Muskhogean - a family of North American Indian languages spoken in the southeastern United States
American-Indian language, Amerind, Amerindian language, American Indian, Indian - any of the languages spoken by Amerindians
Alabama - the Muskhogean language of the Alabama
Chickasaw - the Muskhogean language of the Chickasaw
Chahta, Choctaw - the Muskhogean language of the Choctaw
Hitchiti - the Muskhogean language spoken by the Hitchiti
Koasati - the Muskhogean language spoken by the Koasati
Muskogee - the Muskhogean language spoken by the Muskogee
Seminole - the Muskhogean language of the Seminole
References in periodicals archive ?
No fewer than five of this volume's thirty-six papers deal with Muskogean languages (Cline, Crawford, Hardy and Montler, Kimball, and Ulrich) and grouping them together after the Northwest coast pieces would have illustrated the vitality, nearly sixty years later, of ongoing research in this field whose pioneer linguist was Mary Haas.