brave new world

(redirected from Mustapha Mond)
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Related to Mustapha Mond: brave new world, Bernard Marx

brave new world

n.
1. A world or realm of radically transformed existence, especially one in which technological progress has both positive and negative results.
2. A field, endeavor, or aspect of life that seems new and often intimidating because one is experiencing it for the first time: "You're on your own. Welcome to the brave new world of do-it-yourself travel" (Susan Stellin).

[Originally a phrase written by William Shakespeare in The Tempest (c.1610): How beauteous mankind is! O brave new world / That has such people in't! (later used by Aldous Huxley as the title of his novel Brave New World (1932), a depiction of future dystopia in which humans are separated into rigid castes and controlled through technological and chemical means ).]
References in periodicals archive ?
Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers, explains why feelings are unnecessary and even threatening:
While technologically advanced, the Fordian society watches strictly over scientific discoveries and discourages scientific research that might threaten the stability of society; Mustapha Mond discloses the conflict between science and a Fordian society:
While describing the society he lives in to John the Savage, Mustapha Mond remarks that the World Controllers carefully restrain the growth of science and technology to ensure that many jobs remain labor intensive--all for the good of the lower classes (pp.
Huxley's warnings, offered through Mustapha Mond and other of his characters, were not the idle rambling of a science fiction writer.
The rebellion is brief, and from a tactical standpoint, quite pointless, but it does result in the men being brought before Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers of BNW.
A reader can more easily make these associations due to the editors' decision to begin the collection with lengthy excerpts of Chapters 1, 16, and 17 of BNW; it is Chapter 17 which features the climactic discussion between John the Savage and Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers:
Mustapha Mond disappears from the novel 10 pages before the Delta-Minuses spy John; their awe reintroduces him.
Prominent places and famous landmarks, such as Charing Cross Tower ("Charing-T Tower" [BNW 68]) and Big Ben ("Big Henry" [99]), have been renamed for Ford; the highest religious and temporal authority, Mustapha Mond, is addressed respectfully by Fordian titles, namely, "Our Ford" or "his lordship" (35, 37).
One day, however, Mustapha Mond, one of the World Controllers who ensure stability in this "enlightened" world, receives a paper from a brilliant but erratic scientist, Bernard Marx.
Mustapha Mond, his fellow World Controllers, and the involuntary hedonists of the brave new world are implicit in Huxley's frequent jabs at "the bright H.
Nevertheless, like such fictional world-controllers and corporate moguls from Aldous Huxley's Mustapha Mond in Brave New World to Alan Sillitoe's Claude Moggerhanger in A Start in Life and Life Goes On, Sir Jack remains more a caricature than a character, ultimately unconvincing.
Bernard Marx Peter Gallagher Mustapha Mond Leonard Nimoy John Cooper Tim Guinee Lenina Crowne Rya Kihlstedt Linda Cooper Sally Kirkland DHC Miguel Ferrer