benefit society

(redirected from Mutual aid societies)

benefit society

n
(Insurance) a US term for friendly society
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
* Institutions can accept certain flood coverage plans provided by mutual aid societies, subject to agency approval.
Called 'colorums,' the groups are a combination of religious cult and mutual aid societies, promising eternal salvation in the here and now.
While coffeehouses, clubs, mutual aid societies, and Red Crescent chapters were important to the social and political life of Michigan's Muslim communities, spaces such as those were male-centered and not considered suitable for women.
Most charity was provided by either private mutual aid societies or black churches.
Such societies functioned as mutual aid societies and often served as platforms for political debate and civic action when necessary.
In his introduction, he proffers Marcel van der Linden's definition of mutual aid societies: "associations formed voluntarily for the purpose of providing their members with financial assistance in case of need" (p.
Hayes-Bautista demonstrates how, after Emperor Maximilian's execution and Lincoln's assassination at the end of the Civil War, the "summoning power" of juntas patridticas not only established a public memory of the 1862 Battle at Puebla but also set a tradition of civic assertion for subsequent generations of US-born Latinos and immigrants in the organization of mutualistas (mutual aid societies).
To me, the most fascinating part of the book is a pair of essays on the history of mutual aid societies, written by two leading scholars in the field.
For example, contradicting the image of the imported, cheap Chinese coolie, Chung argues that many miners immigrated with the help of relatives and mutual aid societies, and mined in groups that shared profits.
Cuba has a history of "bottom-up" ventures to draw from, including mutual aid societies like Centro Gallego and Centro Asturiana, which helped immigrants from their respective regions in Spain to acclimate in Cuba in pre-communist times, said University of Miami economics professor Luis Locay.

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