symbiosis

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Related to Mutual dependence: mutual interdependence

sym·bi·o·sis

 (sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs, -bī-)
n. pl. sym·bi·o·ses (-sēz)
1. Biology A close, prolonged association between two or more different organisms of different species that may, but does not necessarily, benefit each member.
2. A relationship of mutual benefit or dependence.

[Greek sumbiōsis, companionship, from sumbioun, to live together, from sumbios, living together : sun-, syn- + bios, life; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

sym′bi·ot′ic (-ŏt′ĭk), sym′bi·ot′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
sym′bi·ot′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

(ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs; ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
1. (Biology) a close and usually obligatory association of two organisms of different species that live together, often to their mutual benefit
2. (Sociology) a similar relationship between interdependent persons or groups
[C19: via New Latin from Greek: a living together; see symbiont]
ˌsymbiˈotic, ˌsymbiˈotical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sym•bi•o•sis

(ˌsɪm biˈoʊ sɪs, -baɪ-)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1.
a. the living together of two dissimilar organisms, as in mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism.
b. (formerly) mutualism.
2. any interdependent or mutually beneficial relationship between two persons, groups, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek symbíōsis=symbiō-, variant s. of symbioûn to live together (sym- sym- + bioûn to live) + -sis -sis]
sym`bi•ot′ic (-ˈɒt ɪk) sym`bi•ot′i•cal, adj.
sym`bi•ot′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sym·bi·o·sis

(sĭm′bē-ō′sĭs)
The close association between two or more different organisms of different species, often but not necessarily benefiting each member.

symbiotic adjective
Did You Know? Two organisms that live together in symbiosis may have one of three kinds of relationships: mutualism, commensalism, or parasitism. The mutualism shown by the rhinoceros and the tickbird benefits both. Riding on the rhino's back, the tickbird eats its fill of the ticks that bother the rhino while the rhino gets warning calls from the bird when it senses danger. In commensalism, one member benefits and the other is unaffected. Certain barnacles attach themselves to whales, gaining a safe home and transportation to food-rich waters. But the whales are generally unaffected by the barnacles' presence. In parasitism, though, one species generally gets hurt, as when fleas infest a dog's coat and feed on its blood.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

a relationship or association between two or more organisms that is harmful to none of them. — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Organisms
the living together of two dissimilar organisms; the relationship may be beneficial to both (mutualism and symbiosis), beneficial to one without effect on the other (commensalism), beneficial to one and detrimental to the other (parasitism), detrimental to the first without any effect on the other (amensalism), or detrimental to both (synnecrosis). — symbiotic, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

symbiosis

The living together of two organisms from different species for mutual benefit.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.symbiosis - the relation between two different species of organisms that are interdependent; each gains benefits from the other
interdependence, interdependency, mutuality - a reciprocal relation between interdependent entities (objects or individuals or groups)
trophobiosis - a symbiotic relation in which one organism protects the other in return for some kind of food product
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] Nsimbiosis f
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbaɪˈəʊsɪs] n
(between organisms)symbiose f
(between people, organizations, systems)symbiose f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

symbiosis

nSymbiose f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

symbiosis

[ˌsɪmbɪˈəʊsɪs] nsimbiosi f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sym·bi·o·sis

n. simbiosis, unión estrecha de dos organismos que pertenecen a especies diferentes.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

symbiosis

n (psych, etc.) simbiosis f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
All that talk makes up her "name," which is handed over from one crew to another without bitterness, without animosity, with the indulgence of mutual dependence, and with the feeling of close association in the exercise of her perfections and in the danger of her defects.
It is a rule which Christians should always follow, in their judgments of one another; and especially is it right and wise among near relatives, whose characters have necessarily a degree of mutual dependence. But is Clifford in the parlor?
By the power of filial reverence and parental affection, individual existence is extended beyond the limits of individual life, and the happiness of every age is chained in mutual dependence upon that of every other.
He analyzes their mutual dependence on technology transfer as well as development of primary and secondary markets, and also explains the conflicts inevitable to this long relationship, including the results of tsarist incursions, the difficulties of relations after the October Revolution, and the changes wrought by the establishment of the People's Republic of China.
The "energy superpower" concept is an illusion and, perhaps most dangerously, does not recognise the mutual dependence between Russia and its energy consumers.
A mutual dependence emerges between the reader and the read wherein the challenge to voice oneself is never more acute.
These surround the relationship between the sisters, and Cruz's writing and Loretta Greco's direction are at their most sensitive in delineating the emotional complications the sisters' mutual dependence involves.
The philosopher Alasdair MacIntyre has shown how the virtues that acknowledge our mutual dependence are essential to a society worthy of the name.
Because clearly, there is a lot more mutual respect between the two nations, there is mutual dependence, and there is recognition of what we need from each other, which is more clearly defined," Romualdez said in a forum in Makati last week organized by the American Chamber of Commerce.
'Japan's export restrictions have broken the framework of economic cooperation between South Korea and Japan that had continued for over half a century based on mutual dependence,' President Moon reacted last week.
China and the USA will compete for international investment, economic mutual dependence, and technological dominance Since January 2018, China and the USA have engaged in a trade war which involves the mutual placement of tariffs.