Muzorewa


Also found in: Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Muzorewa

(ˌmʊzəˈreɪwə)
n
(Biography) Abel (Tendekayi) (ˈeibəl) 1925–2010, Zimabwean Methodist bishop and politician; president of the African National Council (1971–85). He was one of the negotiators of an internal settlement (1978–79); prime minister of Rhodesia (1979)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1978 Zimbabwe had a similar arrangement known as Zimbabwe-Rhodesia, a union of the Ian Smith regime and the so-called progressive nationalists led by Bishop Abel Muzorewa. While it didn't last long, it paved the way for Lancaster House negotiations culminating in Zimbabwe's independence.
1979 Bishop Abel Muzorewa becomes the first black prime minister of Zimbabwe-Rhodesia (formerly Rhodesia).
WHEN was Abel Muzorewa consecrated the first black African Methodist Bishop of (then) Rhodesia?
The attempt by Smith in 1978 to stave off mounting international pressure by forging an Internal Settlement, whereby he handed over the premiership to Bishop Abel Muzorewa, was doomed to early failure as white morale collapsed and nationalist confidence stiffened.
WISCONSIN -- Michael Felton, Amy Frederick, Ashley Melanson, Charles Muzorewa
38 YEARS AGO (1979) The former British colony of Rhodesia became known as Zimbabwe-Rhodesia as Bishop Muzorewa became the country's first black premier.
His anti-colonial stance, however, was nearly quashed when Bishop Abel Muzorewa released him from prison on the condition that Mapfumo play at a Muzorewa rally.
With the Patriotic Front (PF) and the Smith government at seemingly nonnegotiable loggerheads, Smith went ahead with internal talks and, working with the largely ceremonial African politician, Bishop Abel Muzorewa, they agreed to a compromise government to be voted on and established as an internal settlement in 1979.
He was eventually released in March 1979, but on the condition he perform at a rally for Bishop Abel Muzorewa's United African National Council in Bulawayo.
Bishop Abel Muzorewa, the first black prime minister of an interim white-dominated government before Zimbabwe's independence, died six days before his 85th birthday.
The Western countries led by Great Britain and the United States attempted to keep the Black liberation movement in Zimbabwe from becoming radicalized by placing Bishop Abel Muzorewa in the position of Prime Minister in the Settler regime (Nessbitt cited in Sklar, 1980).
While individual personalities, such as Ian Smith, "Comrade [Robert] Mugabe", "[Joshua] Nkomo" and "the Bishop" (a reference to Bishop Abel Muzorewa), appear in the background, they lend the narrative historical flavour.