My Lai

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My Lai

 (mē′ lī′)
A village of southern Vietnam where more than 300 unarmed civilians, including women and children, were massacred by US troops (March 1968) during the Vietnam War.

My Lai

(ˈmaɪ ˈlaɪ; ˈmiː)
n
(Placename) a village in S Vietnam where in 1968 US troops massacred over 400 civilians
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of the images are disturbing, particularly the ones of the My Lai Massacre, one of the most horrific atrocities committed against 500 unarmed civilians of My Lai village, all women, children and old men.
If you're looking to dispel any starry-eyed misconceptions your kids may hold about war, the PBS American Experience episode about the 1968 My Lai massacre is a good place to start.
The My Lai Massacre (1968) in Vietnam was exposed by a brave whistleblower.
Another nail in the coffin, he said, was the My Lai Massacre, which occurred shortly afterward.
Lieutenant William Calley was found guilty of his part in the 1968 My Lai massacre in which US troops opened fire on unarmed villagers, killing 500.
On 16th March 1968, US military troops killed an estimated 504 Vietnamese residents in what came to be known as the My Lai Massacre. This was a prominent incident that took place during the Vietnam War, which was a proxy-war that tied into the greater Cold War politics of the twentieth century.
Throughout his decades-long career, he made sure the public heard about such monumental events as the My Lai massacre during the Vietnam War (for which his work received a Pulitzer Prize), Watergate, Kissinger's White House, Korean Air Flight 007, Israel's nuclear weapons program, Abu Ghraib, the killing of Osama Bin Laden, and more.
These include war crimes during World War I and World War II, the Anton Dostler case, the Zyklon B trial, the Belsen trial, the Buchenwald trial, the Malmedy Massacre trial, the Nuremberg trial, the Einsatzgruppen case and Otto Ohlendorf, Karl Brandt, the Tokyo war crimes trial, the trial of General Tomoyuki Yamashita, the Khabarovsk war crime trial, the Eichmann trial, the My Lai Massacre, the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia, the Rwandan genocide, and trials of Dusko Tadic, Slobodan Milosevic, Radovan Karadzic, Radislav Krstic, Charles Taylor, Theoneste Bagosora, Jean-Bosco Barayagwiza, Ferdinand Nahimana, Hassan Ngeze, Jean-Paul Akayesu, Ante Gotovina, Thomas Lubanga Dyilo, and Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo.
The My Lai massacre of that year contributed massively to the eventual pull-out.
An FBI agent once described the atrocity as the "My Lai massacre of Iraq." They were never held to account, although Washington claims otherwise.
Memorial in Qu?ng Ngai Province, of Vietnam is dedicated to victims of the My Lai massacre. The graves with headstones, signs on the places of killing, are in The War Remnants Museum in Ho Chi Minh City.