mynah

(redirected from Mynah Birds)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Related to Mynah Birds: hill mynah

my·na

or my·nah  (mī′nə)
n.
Any of various starlings found in South and Southeast Asia and on some islands of the South Pacific, most of which are bluish-black or dark brown with a yellow bill. Certain species, especially the hill myna, are known for mimicry of human speech.

[Hindi mainā, perhaps from Sanskrit madanaḥ, from madana-, delightful, joyful, from madati, it bubbles.]

mynah

(ˈmaɪnə) or

myna

n
(Animals) any of various tropical Asian starlings of the genera Acridotheres, Gracula, etc, esp G. religiosa (see hill mynah), some of which can mimic human speech
[C18: from Hindi mainā, from Sanskrit madana]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mynah - tropical Asian starlingsmynah - tropical Asian starlings    
starling - gregarious birds native to the Old World
Acridotheres tristis, crested myna - dark brown crested bird of southeastern Asia
grackle, Gracula religiosa, hill myna, Indian grackle - glossy black Asiatic starling often taught to mimic speech
Translations
loskuták
mænir
Hint sığırcığımina

mynah

(ˈmainə) noun
a small tropical bird that can mimic human speech.
References in periodicals archive ?
Pathophysiology of excessive iron storage in mynah birds. J Am Vet Med Assoc.
I told the domestic staff to be alert and armed with a thick stick, while moving around the compound, stressing the fact that they should pay heed to our very efficient anti snake alarm system the Mynah birds, who have over the years claimed my house as their own.
I remember going around Brixton market with my nan (along with Brockwell Park and its exotic mynah birds, one of my favourite trips out) and her telling me that the problem with "people of colour" was that they didn't know how to behave.
In fact, the infection is prevalent among mynah birds. [24,25] Avian chlamydiosis may bring various diseases to such as anorexia, apathy, conjunctivitis, diarrhea, rhinorrhea, and slower hatching rates.
I read with interest your article about Mr Assadullah and his research on Mynah birds in the last issue of GulfWeekly.
Mynah birds and palm squirrels flitted about and, mercifully, a pre-monsoon downpour temperature dip from 39C to 32 C.
Mynah birds can also be spiteful, so I implore your readers to take care and keep their faces away from such birds.