misogyny

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mi·sog·y·ny

 (mĭ-sŏj′ə-nē)
n.
Hatred or mistrust of women.

[Greek mīsoguniā : mīso-, miso- + gunē, woman; see -gyny.]

mis′o·gyn′ic (mĭs′ə-jĭn′ĭk, -gī′nĭk) adj.

misogyny

(mɪˈsɒdʒɪnɪ; maɪ-)
n
hatred of women
[C17: from Greek, from miso- + gunē woman]
miˈsogynist n, adj
miˌsogyˈnistic, miˈsogynous adj

mi•sog•y•ny

(mɪˈsɒdʒ ə ni, maɪ-)

n.
hatred of or hostility toward women.
[1650–60; < Greek mīsogynía= mīsogyn(ēs) a woman-hater (mīso- miso- + -gynēs, adj. derivative of gynḗ woman) + -ia -y3]
mi•sog′y•nic, mi•sog′y•nous, mi•sog`y•nis′tic, adj.
mi•sog′y•nist, n.

misogyny

a hatred of women — misogynist, n.
See also: Women
an extreme dislike of females, frequently based upon unhappy experience or upbringing. Cf. misandry.
See also: Attitudes
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.misogyny - hatred of womenmisogyny - hatred of women      
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
philogyny - admiration for women

misogyny

noun
Quotations
"Nothing makes a man hate a woman more than her constant conversation" [William Wycherley The Country Wife]
"Sir, a woman preaching is like a dog's walking on his hind legs. It is not done well; but you are surprised to find it done at all." [Dr. Johnson]
Translations
misogynianaisviha

misogyny

[mɪˈsɒdʒɪnɪ] Nmisoginia f

misogyny

[mɪˈsɒdʒɪni] nmisogynie f

misogyny

nFrauenfeindlichkeit f, → Misogynie f (geh)

mi·sog·y·ny

n. misoginia, aversión a las mujeres.
References in periodicals archive ?
For the Journal in its editorial to highlight racism, anti-semitism etc is ironic when the Labour Party is so obviously racist, sexist and riddled with mysogyny. Ask Luciana Berger or Margaret Beckett from the Labour Party for their views of racism within the party.
After marching from Newcastle Civic Centre chanting "refugees welcome here, Donald Trump out", the crowd heard a number of speakers accusing the American leader of "racism and mysogyny".
Some even accused him of mysogyny but he said he'd never even heard of the cow.
Other critics have claimed that, by describing the evil deeds of these women, Shakespeare himself exhibits his mysogyny and fear of female power, and resolves this by eliminating the female characters which jeopardize the masculine identity and rule (2).