mysticism

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mys·ti·cism

 (mĭs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Belief in direct experience of transcendent reality or God, especially by means of contemplation and asceticism instead of rational thought.
b. Such experience had by an individual.
2. Belief in the existence of realities beyond perceptual or intellectual apprehension that are directly accessible by subjective experience: belief in séances, astral projection, and similar mysticism.
3. Belief that is not based on evidence or subjected to criticism: "[When] grappling with the evils they have themselves exposed ... these lifelong Marxists drift off into vague mysticism and into worship of personality" (I.F. Stone).

mysticism

(ˈmɪstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. belief in or experience of a reality surpassing normal human understanding or experience, esp a reality perceived as essential to the nature of life
2. (Theology) a system of contemplative prayer and spirituality aimed at achieving direct intuitive experience of the divine
3. obscure or confused belief or thought

mys•ti•cism

(ˈmɪs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the beliefs, ideas, or mode of thought of mystics.
2. the doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding, or of a direct, intimate union of the soul with God through contemplation or spiritual ecstasy.
3. obscure thought or speculation.
[1730–40]

Mysticism


the mystical teachings of Jakob Boehme (1575-1624), an influence on George Fox and Quakerism. — Boehmenist, Boehmist, Boehmenite, n.
the mystical theories of Antoinette Bourignon (1616-80), popular in the Netherlands and in Scotland.
the beliefs and practices of pre-Christian and early Christian sects, condemned by the church, especially the conviction that matter is evil and that knowledge is more important than faith, and the practice of esoteric mysticism. — Gnostic, n., adj.
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. Literature. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
the doctrine that knowledge of the Absolute is within human reach, but through a higher religious consciousness rather than by logical processes. See also god and gods. — metagnostic, adj.
1. the principles, doctrines, and practices of mysticism.
2. the interpretation of mysteries, as the Eleusinian. — mystagogue, n. — mystagogic, mystagogical, adj.
a teacher of mystical doctrines.
the practice of staring at one’s navel to induce a mystical trance. Also called omphaloskepsis. — omphalopsychite, n.
the Gnostic concept of the spiritual world, representing the fullness of the Divine Being and the eons emanating therefrom.
1. any of various forms of philosophical or religious thought claiming a mystical insight into the divine nature and natural phenomena.
2. (cap.) the system of belief and practice of the Theosophical Society. — theosophist, n. — theosophical, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate realitymysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
Sufism - Islamic mysticism
2.mysticism - obscure or irrational thought
cerebration, intellection, mentation, thinking, thought process, thought - the process of using your mind to consider something carefully; "thinking always made him frown"; "she paused for thought"
Translations
misticizam

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] Nmisticismo m; (= doctrine, literary genre) → mística f

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] nmysticisme m

mysticism

nMystizismus m; (of poetry etc)Mystik f, → Mystische(s) nt

mysticism

[ˈmɪˌstɪsɪzm] nmisticismo
References in periodicals archive ?
For some, the mystical experience did not need to be expressed in religious terms, as in the case of Henri Le Sidaner, who was described by a contemporary critic as 'a sort of mystic without a faith'.
Thank you, Cecile Licad, for the exalting and mystical experience.
Spanish bishop Manuel Gonzalez Garcia, who became known as the "Bishop of the Tabernacle" after a mystical experience in a church near Seville, was also elevated, along with Italians Father Lodovico Pavoni and Alfonso Maria Fusco, who founded religious congregations and worked with the poor in the 19th century.
Pubs like the traditional 'spit and sawdust' real ale mecca - The Duck and Drake in Leeds - were spoken about in hushed, reverential tones and actually entering their hallowed portals was akin to a mystical experience for some.
Synopsis: In "Universal Spiritual Philosophy and Practice: an Informal Textbook for Discerning Seekers", academician, freelance teacher, counselor, lecturer and dreamworker, David Low presents all the central insights of mystical experience, and relates them in a practical way to psychological understandings of spiritual maturity.
Using brain scan data, the researchers were able to examine how damage to certain parts of the brain affected the likelihood of having a mystical experience.
It contains the phases of the transformative experience, as well as meditations, exercises, and visualizations to deepen the mystical experience.
It's hardly a surprise when, towards the close, an apparently mystical experience suggests an even closer connection between them.
The third section of the work, entitled "The Mystical Experience," is the most systematic, especially in its presentation of nine sutras on mysticism (127-210) and "mystical languages" (211-412).
I attended a weekend retreat where the teacher promised us a mystical experience.
His topics are art and compunction: Francesco Bocchi's mystical experience of art; Leon Battista Alberti's "De pictura" and the Christian tradition of the liberal arts; the works of God and the book of the world in the writings of Leonardo da Vinci; imaging the souls of holy people; invention and amplification: imagining sacred history; and Vasari's city of God: spirituality, art, and architecture in Vasari's "Lives" and "Ragionamenti.
HAD = Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale; LOT = Life Orientation Test; TAS = Tellegen Absorption Scale; EDN = Experienced Deviation from Normal State; MES = Mystical Experience Scale.