mysticism

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mys·ti·cism

 (mĭs′tĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. Belief in direct experience of transcendent reality or God, especially by means of contemplation and asceticism instead of rational thought.
b. Such experience had by an individual.
2. Belief in the existence of realities beyond perceptual or intellectual apprehension that are directly accessible by subjective experience: belief in séances, astral projection, and similar mysticism.
3. Belief that is not based on evidence or subjected to criticism: "[When] grappling with the evils they have themselves exposed ... these lifelong Marxists drift off into vague mysticism and into worship of personality" (I.F. Stone).

mysticism

(ˈmɪstɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. belief in or experience of a reality surpassing normal human understanding or experience, esp a reality perceived as essential to the nature of life
2. (Theology) a system of contemplative prayer and spirituality aimed at achieving direct intuitive experience of the divine
3. obscure or confused belief or thought

mys•ti•cism

(ˈmɪs təˌsɪz əm)

n.
1. the beliefs, ideas, or mode of thought of mystics.
2. the doctrine of an immediate spiritual intuition of truths believed to transcend ordinary understanding, or of a direct, intimate union of the soul with God through contemplation or spiritual ecstasy.
3. obscure thought or speculation.
[1730–40]

Mysticism


the mystical teachings of Jakob Boehme (1575-1624), an influence on George Fox and Quakerism. — Boehmenist, Boehmist, Boehmenite, n.
the mystical theories of Antoinette Bourignon (1616-80), popular in the Netherlands and in Scotland.
the beliefs and practices of pre-Christian and early Christian sects, condemned by the church, especially the conviction that matter is evil and that knowledge is more important than faith, and the practice of esoteric mysticism. — Gnostic, n., adj.
1. the occult concepts, ideas, or philosophy set forth in the writings of the hermeticists of the late Middle Ages and the early Renaissance.
2. adherence to, belief in, or propagation of these concepts and ideas.
3. Literature. a symbolic and arcane style similar to that of the hermeticists, especially in the poetry of certain French symbolist poets. — hermeticist, hermetist, n. — hermetic, hermetical, adj.
the doctrine that knowledge of the Absolute is within human reach, but through a higher religious consciousness rather than by logical processes. See also god and gods. — metagnostic, adj.
1. the principles, doctrines, and practices of mysticism.
2. the interpretation of mysteries, as the Eleusinian. — mystagogue, n. — mystagogic, mystagogical, adj.
a teacher of mystical doctrines.
the practice of staring at one’s navel to induce a mystical trance. Also called omphaloskepsis. — omphalopsychite, n.
the Gnostic concept of the spiritual world, representing the fullness of the Divine Being and the eons emanating therefrom.
1. any of various forms of philosophical or religious thought claiming a mystical insight into the divine nature and natural phenomena.
2. (cap.) the system of belief and practice of the Theosophical Society. — theosophist, n. — theosophical, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.mysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate realitymysticism - a religion based on mystical communion with an ultimate reality
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
quietism - a form of religious mysticism requiring withdrawal from all human effort and passive contemplation of God
Sufism - Islamic mysticism
2.mysticism - obscure or irrational thought
cerebration, intellection, mentation, thinking, thought process, thought - the process of using your mind to consider something carefully; "thinking always made him frown"; "she paused for thought"
Translations
misticizam

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] Nmisticismo m; (= doctrine, literary genre) → mística f

mysticism

[ˈmɪstɪsɪzəm] nmysticisme m

mysticism

nMystizismus m; (of poetry etc)Mystik f, → Mystische(s) nt

mysticism

[ˈmɪˌstɪsɪzm] nmisticismo
References in periodicals archive ?
Palmquist successfully defends Kant, on Kant's own terms, against various allegations, including prominently the following: (1) that his philosophy is antimetaphysical; (2) that he reduces religion to morality; (3) that he is a deist, not a theist; and (4) that he denies even the possibility of mystical experience.
What seems to be new in Teasdale's emerging "Interspiritual Age" is that the mystical experience is emerging in ever larger numbers of people, and he encourages those numbers to grow.
mystical experience" was conducted by Walter Pahnke.
In that book, redemption comes in terms of the mystical experience. It concludes that the purpose of the mystical experience is to let the person who prays know precisely the kind of power he's addressing.
into the very fabric of our daily lives" may bring us as close to mystical experience as we are likely to get in our gallery rounds.
the significant difference obtained between clinical and nonclinical groups--the former being higher--by Thalbourne and Delin [1994] on the Mystical Experience Scale [Thalbourne, 1991].) I would interpret these results in the framework of the theory of transliminality: high scores on paranormal belief (and, for that matter, on mystical experience) go along with elevated scores on psychopathology, all of which (and perhaps also ESP) are phenomena caused by a "leaky" mental threshold (Thalbourne & Delin, 1994).
After all, the constant bond of prayer and a communal mystical experience should be the most important aspect of ecumenism for the people of God who are not professional ecumenists engaged in discussions on a high scholarly level.
In his later life, he himself showed an earnest yearning for mystical experience; he even thought that psychedelic drugs would give him entry into that other world he wanted to reach.
At the h eight of prayer and mystical experience, the God who has let us feast on his body in the eucharist returns to devour, decreate, and transform, not so much our bodies as those portions of our personality which are structured and informed by a fundamental egotism, the obstinate belief that my self is real, substantial, and that it is the center of the universe.
Instead, the three academics want to launch a science to study the characteristics of human consciousness that make mystical experience possible.
When I began retreat, I wanted a mystical experience. Even after two years, I was lonely and chagrined at the death of my life-long friend.
Arraj concludes this section by wondering if connaturality allows for a universal, mystical experience for all who seek and love the Divine.