myth

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Related to Myths: Greek myths, Urban myths

myth

 (mĭth)
n.
1.
a. A traditional, typically ancient story dealing with supernatural beings, ancestors, or heroes that serves as a fundamental type in the worldview of a people, as by explaining aspects of the natural world or delineating the psychology, customs, or ideals of society: the myth of Eros and Psyche; a creation myth.
b. Such stories considered as a group: the realm of myth.
2. A popular belief or story that has become associated with a person, institution, or occurrence, especially one considered to illustrate a cultural ideal: a star whose fame turned her into a myth; the pioneer myth of suburbia.
3. A fiction or half-truth, especially one that forms part of an ideology.
4. A fictitious story, person, or thing: "German artillery superiority on the Western Front was a myth" (Leon Wolff).

[New Latin mȳthus, from Late Latin mȳthos, from Greek mūthos.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

myth

(mɪθ)
n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend)
a. a story about superhuman beings of an earlier age taken by preliterate society to be a true account, usually of how natural phenomena, social customs, etc, came into existence
b. another word for mythology1, mythology3
2. a person or thing whose existence is fictional or unproven
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) (in modern literature) a theme or character type embodying an idea: Hemingway's myth of the male hero.
4. (Philosophy) philosophy (esp in the writings of Plato) an allegory or parable
[C19: via Late Latin from Greek muthos fable, word]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

myth

(mɪθ)

n.
1. a traditional or legendary story, esp. one that involves gods and heroes and explains a cultural practice or natural phenomenon.
2. stories of this kind collectively.
3. an invented story, fictitious person, etc.: His account of the event is pure myth.
4. a belief or set of beliefs, often unproven or false, that have accrued around a person, phenomenon, or institution: myths of racial superiority.
[1820–30; < Late Latin mȳthos < Greek mŷthos story, word]
syn: See legend.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

myth

A fictitious story, frequently intended to explain a phenomenon and generally concerning gods or beings from before written history; a story in which a theme or character embodies an idea in a similar way.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.myth - a traditional story accepted as historymyth - a traditional story accepted as history; serves to explain the world view of a people
story - a piece of fiction that narrates a chain of related events; "he writes stories for the magazines"
Gotterdammerung, Ragnarok, Twilight of the Gods - myth about the ultimate destruction of the gods in a battle with evil
mythology - myths collectively; the body of stories associated with a culture or institution or person
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

myth

noun
2. illusion, story, fancy, fantasy, imagination, invention, delusion, superstition, fabrication, falsehood, figment, tall story, cock and bull story (informal) Contrary to popular myth, most women are not spendthrifts.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

myth

noun
1. A traditional story or tale that has no proven factual basis:
2. A body of traditional beliefs and notions accumulated about a particular subject:
3. Any fictitious idea accepted as part of an ideology by an uncritical group; a received idea:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أُسْطُورَةٌأسْطورَهاسطورة
mýtus
myte
myyttiuskomuskertomus
mit
mítoszrege
goîsögn
神話
신화
kaip mitasmitasmitologijamitologinispramanytas
mīts
mýtus
izmišljotinamit
myt
นิทานปรัมปรา
thần thoại

myth

[mɪθ] N (= story) → mito m; (= imaginary person, thing) → mito m, ilusión f
a Greek mythun mito griego
that's a mytheso es un mito
it's a myth that boiling water freezes faster than cold wateres un mito que el agua hirviendo se congela más rápidamente que el agua fría
see also urban B
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

myth

[ˈmɪθ] n
(= legend) → mythe m
a Greek myth → un mythe grec
(= fallacy) → mythe m
That's a myth → C'est un mythe.
the myth of love at first sight → le mythe du coup de foudre
contrary to popular myth ... → contrairement aux idées reçues ...
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

myth

nMythos m; (fig)Märchen nt; it’s a myth (fig)das ist doch ein Gerücht or Märchen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

myth

[mɪθ] nmito
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

myth

(miθ) noun
an ancient, fictional story, especially one dealing with gods, heroes etc.
ˈmythical adjective
ˈmythically adverb
mythology (miˈθolədʒi) noun
(a collection of) myths.
ˌmythoˈlogical (-ˈlo-) adjective
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

myth

أُسْطُورَةٌ mýtus myte Mythos μύθος mito myytti mythe mit mito 神話 신화 mythe myte mit mito миф myt นิทานปรัมปรา efsane thần thoại 神话
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009

myth

n mito
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in classic literature ?
Ah, it would be just the spot for one to sit in, of a summer afternoon, and tell the children some more of those wild stories from the classic myths!"
Folklore, legends, myths and fairy tales have followed childhood through the ages, for every healthy youngster has a wholesome and instinctive love for stories fantastic, marvelous and manifestly unreal.
Also, I still believed in the old myths which were the heritage of the American boy when I was a boy.
This latter is commonly designated as folk-lore and embraces popularly myths and superstitions.
At first sight such a work seems to be a miscellany of myths, technical advice, moral precepts, and folklore maxims without any unifying principle; and critics have readily taken the view that the whole is a canto of fragments or short poems worked up by a redactor.
Modern myths are even less understood than ancient ones, harried as we are with myths.
I can visualize the entire scene--the apelike Grimaldi men huddled in their filthy caves; the huge pterodactyls soaring through the heavy air upon their bat-like wings; the mighty dinosaurs moving their clumsy hulks beneath the dark shadows of preglacial forests--the dragons which we considered myths until science taught us that they were the true recollections of the first man, handed down through countless ages by word of mouth from father to son out of the unrecorded dawn of humanity."
It is not all on the same plane; it easily passes from ideas to myths and fancies, from facts to figures of speech.
Knowing him, I review the old Scandinavian myths with clearer understanding.
It seemed curious enough to be standing face to face, as it were, with old Dagobert I., and Clovis and Charlemagne, those vague, colossal heroes, those shadows, those myths of a thousand years ago!
He had never received a sign of the existence of one, and from absence of judgment in rejecting all he wrote it seemed plausible that editors were myths, manufactured and maintained by office boys, typesetters, and pressmen.
In the remote earliest form of the stories, as Celtic myths, this supernatural element was no doubt frank and very large, but Malory's authorities, the more skeptical French romancers, adapting it to their own age, had often more or less fully rationalized it; transforming, for instance, the black river of Death which the original heroes often had to cross on journeys to the Celtic Other World into a rude and forbidding moat about the hostile castle into which the romancers degraded the Other World itself.