nonoxynol-9

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non·ox·y·nol-9

 (nŏn-ŏk′sə-nôl′nīn′, -nŏl′-, -nōl′-)
n.
A spermicide widely used in contraceptive creams, foams, and lubricants.

[non(ane), alkane having nine carbons (from Latin nōnus, ninth; see noon) + (eth)oxy + (etha)nol + 9 (from from its chain of nine ethoxy groups).]
References in periodicals archive ?
The finding comes 9 months after the Food and Drug Administration issued a nonbinding draft guidance warning that N-9 could irritate the vagina and rectum and increase STI risk.
The primary goal of this multicenter, randomized clinical trial was to compare the efficacy of different N-9 spermicide formulations.
Christine Mauck commented that the findings are consistent with earlier observations that the differences in lesions between placebo and N-9 are seen only in frequent users.
* N-9 offers no protection against STIs such as gonorrhea and chlamydial infection.
* Condoms lubricated with N-9 should no longer be promoted because there is no evidence that they are more effective in preventing pregnancy or infection than condoms lubricated with silicone.
On October 10 the Bay Area Reporter, a San Francisco gay newspaper, reported that all lubricant manufacturers had now promised to stop making lubricant with N-9. This followed an earlier series of articles in the B.A.R.
We, the undersigned, in light of recent statements by the World Health Organization and the Centers for Disease Control, urge all people to cease the rectal use of products containing Nonoxynol-9 (N-9).
Unfortunately, evidence indicates that N-9 does not reduce the risk of sexually transmitted infections (STI) or HIV/AIDS.
As a result, N-9 should not be used for STI or HIV prevention, according to the report, but couples can rely on condoms to help prevent them.
CDC collected information on types of N-9 contraceptives purchased and family planning program (FPP) guidelines for N-9 contraceptive use.
THE spermicide nonoxynol-9 (N-9) has been widely available as a contraceptive for many years and has been shown to be effective against HIV in laboratory studies.
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated its Guidelines for the Treatment of Sexually Transmitted Diseases, also warning against using N-9 for STD prevention.
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