butane

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bu·tane

 (byo͞o′tān′)
n.
Either of two isomers of a gaseous hydrocarbon, C4H10, produced synthetically from petroleum and used as a household fuel, refrigerant, and aerosol propellant and in the manufacture of synthetic rubber.

American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

butane

(ˈbjuːteɪn; bjuːˈteɪn)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a colourless flammable gaseous alkane that exists in two isomeric forms, both of which occur in natural gas. The stable isomer, n-butane, is used mainly in the manufacture of rubber and fuels (such as Calor Gas). Formula: C4H10
[C19: from but(yl) + -ane]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bu•tane

(ˈbyu teɪn, byuˈteɪn)

n.
a colorless, flammable gas, C4H10, used chiefly in the manufacture of rubber and as fuel.
[1870–75]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bu·tane

(byo͞o′tān′)
An organic compound, C4H10, found in natural gas and produced from petroleum. Butane is used as a fuel, refrigerant, and propellant in aerosol cans.

butyl (byo͞o′təl) adjective
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.butane - occurs in natural gas; used in the manufacture of rubber and fuels
fuel - a substance that can be consumed to produce energy; "more fuel is needed during the winter months"; "they developed alternative fuels for aircraft"
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
alkane, alkane series, methane series, paraffin series, paraffin - a series of non-aromatic saturated hydrocarbons with the general formula CnH(2n+2)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
butan
butaani
bútan
butan
butan
butan

butane

[ˈbjuːteɪn]
A. Nbutano m (US) (for camping) → camping gas m
B. CPD butane gas Ngas m butano
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

butane

[ˈbjuːteɪn] n (also butane gas) → butane m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

butane

nButan nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

butane

[ˈbjuːteɪn] n (also butane gas) → butano
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
A fatal case of n-butane poisoning after inhaling antiperspiration aerosol deodorant.
1, Methane; 2, ethane; 3, propane; 4, isobutane; 5, n-butane; 6, neopentane; 7, isopentane; 8, n-pentane; 9, methyl cyclopentane; 10, cyclohexane; 11, 2-methylpentane; 12, 3-methylpentane; 13, n-hexane; 14, 2,2/3,3-dimethyl pentane; 15, methyl cyclohexane; 16, 2/3methylhexane +2,3-dimethyl pentane; 17, n-heptane; 18, benzene; 19, n-octane; 20, methylbenzene; 21, n-nonane; 22, ethylbenzene; 23, p-xylene; 24, o-xylene.
In each sample, methane, ethane, propane, i-butane, n-butane, neo-pentane, i-pentane, n-pentane, ethylene, propylene, 1-butene, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and carbon dioxide were determined.
[11], another reaction mechanism including 127 species and 1207 elementary reactions proposed by Konnov [13], and the LLNL N-Butane mechanism.
Its gas is composed of: 65% methane, 20% ethane, 14% propane, 4.5% N-butane, 2% isobutane, 2.6% pentane, 1% N2, 1.5% CO[sup.2], and 0.1% H2S.
Additionally, the influence of admixing ethane, propane, n-butane or hydrogen is implemented, enabling the calculation of binary CNG substitutes.
Additional samples were prepared by blending denatured ethanol, winter Conventional Before Oxygenate Blending (CBOB) gasoline, and n-butane.
[4] Sheen DA, Manion JA (2014) Kinetics of the reactions of H and CH3 radicals with n-butane: an experimental design study using reaction network analysis.
This can be explained using the density temperature diagram of n-butane, which is shown in Figure 7.
The simplest way to boost the octane number is usually by blending in more normal butane (n-butane), which is cheap and has a high octane rating.
More than two-thirds of Russian butadiene capacities are based on n-butane rather than on ethylene.