NSAIDs


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NSAIDs

(nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs). Used to treat or reduce inflammation. “Nonsteroidal” means they do not contain hormones, unlike some other types of antiinflammatory drugs.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
References in periodicals archive ?
However, patients with coronary artery disease should use caution when taking OTC nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).
A patient's pre-existing health conditions should be considered when selecting an NSAID. NSAIDs interfere with the COX-1 enzyme, which is involved in protecting the lining of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, and consequently NSAIDs may cause GI problems.
The analysis of 18 studies examined the association between acetaminophen, NSAIDs, and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitors, and the risk of Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis flares, and IBD.
The two major issues with the use of NSAIDs regarding neck and spinal pain in general is associated with the conflicting evidence regarding efficacy as well as the negative adverse effects.
Rates of pulmonary hypertension, renal failure, eclampsia, or intensive care unit admission were similar between women who received NSAIDs during the postpartum period and women who did not.
Researchers say they found a link between routine use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and a heightened risk.
There has been a recent increase in the use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and low-dose aspirin (LDA), both of which are risk factors for peptic ulcers and upper gastrointestinal bleeding with prolonged administration [1-12].
Non-selective non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen could increase the risk of being admitted to hospital with the heart problem, a study found.
Almost 15 million NSAIDs were prescribed in England last year.
TEHRAN (FNA)- New research shows that common painkillers (NSAIDs) have more side effects than we think, and that they should be used with great care in patients with heart disease.
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued stronger warnings about using over-the-counter (OTC) nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), including naproxen (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil), based on findings that NSAIDs can increase the risk of heart attack and stroke.
A study published in the journal Hypertension found that those with high blood pressure who regularly take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) have an elevated risk of developing chronic kidney disease.