NZEF


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NZEF

abbreviation for
(Military) New Zealand Expeditionary Force, the New Zealand army that served throughout World War I. 2NZEF is used to refer to the Second New Zealand Expeditionary Force, in World War II
References in periodicals archive ?
Like Lee, whose writing career began as a correspondent for Chronicles of the NZEF, MacGill also recorded life in France as soldiers prepared for battle, while he wrote two semi-autobiographical accounts about actual combat, The Great Push (1916) and The Red Horizon (1916).
Military personnel were classified as having Maori ethnicity if they: had a first, second, or surname in the Maori language; had a parent with a Maori language name; were buried in a Maori cemetery or had a memorial in such a cemetery; or had a iwi (tribal) affiliation listed in the Cenotaph database covering NZEF personnel (purchased from the Auckland War Memorial Museum [7]).
{22} The constitution of the NZEF and the AIF in 1914, and the legends that were created from the ANZAC campaign are integrally linked to this legislative period through the Australian Defence Act 1909.
New Zealand Employers' Federation and EEO Trust (1993) A guide for Employers on the Human Rights Act and Equal Employment Opportunity, NZEF, Wellington.
But to enlist in the NZEF men had to be British citizens and not all the Chinese in New Zealand held that status.
By early 1916 Field Punishment was widely used by both the AIF and the NZEF. To administer this lower level of punishment, the Anzac Field Punishment Compound was set up at Moascar in Egypt, while in Europe, the 1st Anzac Field Punishment Compound was set up in the vicinity of I ANZAC Corps HQ.
He also played against in the 2nd NZEF ("Kiwis") tour at Cardiff Arms Park at the Arms Park in 1946 when the New Zealanders won by 11-3.
But finally, on 1 November 1914, with HMS Minotaur, HMAS Sydney, HMAS Melbourne and the Japanese cruiser Ibuki as escort, the AIF accompanied by NZEF, began its first voyage to the war.
Veterans of the earlier conflict made important contributions to the raising and early campaigning Of both the AIF and NZEF. While the contingents and their experiences are the major focus of the book, Crawford does not neglect the mobilisation of opinion and activity back in New Zealand, nor gloss over the intolerance of dissenting views to which the war gave rise, and which presaged other more violent differences of opinion which would occur during subsequent conflicts.
For about fifteen years Bryn Dolan, Patrick Gariepy and myself have been compiling a biographical background and photo of all the AIF and NZEF officers who died as a result of service on Gallipoli.