borax

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Related to Na2b4o7: borax, Sodium tetraborate

bo·rax

 (bôr′ăks′, -əks)
n.
1. A hydrated sodium borate, Na2B4O7·10H2O, an ore of boron, that is used as a cleaning compound.
2. Cheap merchandise, especially tasteless furnishings: "today's glinty borax" (New Yorker).

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin bōrāx, from Arabic būraq, from Middle Persian būrak. Sense 2, perhaps from the custom of giving away borax soap as a premium for the sale of cheap furniture .]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

borax

(ˈbɔːræks)
n, pl -raxes or -races (-rəˌsiːz)
1. (Minerals) Also called: tincal a soluble readily fusible white mineral consisting of impure hydrated disodium tetraborate in monoclinic crystalline form, occurring in alkaline soils and salt deposits. Formula: Na2B4O7.10H2O
2. (Elements & Compounds) pure disodium tetraborate
[C14: from Old French boras, from Medieval Latin borax, from Arabic būraq, from Persian būrah]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

bo•rax1

(ˈbɔr æks, -əks, ˈboʊr-)

n., pl. bo•rax•es, bo•ra•ces (ˈbɔr əˌsiz, ˈboʊr-)
a water-soluble powder or crystals, hydrated sodium borate, Na2B4O7∙10H2O, used as a flux, as a cleansing agent, in glassmaking, and in tanning.
[1350–1400; Middle English boras < Middle French < Medieval Latin borax]

bo•rax2

(ˈbɔr æks, -əks, ˈboʊr-)

n.
cheap, showy, poorly made merchandise, esp. cheaply built furniture of an undistinguished or heterogeneous style.
[1940–45, Amer.; of uncertain orig.]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

bo·rax

(bôr′ăks′)
A white, crystalline powder and mineral used as an antiseptic, as a cleansing agent, and in fusing metals and making heat-resistant glass. The mineral is an ore of boron.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.borax - an ore of boron consisting of hydrated sodium borate; used as a flux or cleansing agent
atomic number 5, boron, B - a trivalent metalloid element; occurs both in a hard black crystal and in the form of a yellow or brown powder
mineral - solid homogeneous inorganic substances occurring in nature having a definite chemical composition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

borax

[ˈbɔːræks] N (boraxes or boraces (pl)) → bórax m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

borax

[ˈbɔːræks] nborax m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

borax

nBorax m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

borax

[ˈbɔːræks] nborace m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

bo·rax

n. bórax, borato de sodio.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Elution Buffer A Na2HPO4, Na2B4O7 and NaN3 (pH 8.2) and Elusion Buffer B acetonitrile: methyl alcohol: water (45:45:10) were used.
En was added to a solution of (NH4)6Mo7O24 (0.5 mmol), Na2B4O7 (1.5 mmol) and Ni(NO3)2 (1.5 mmol) with stirring until the pH was adjusted to 10.5.
In first experiment, wheat seeds were primed with 1, 0.5, 0.1, 0.05 and 0.01 M B solutions of boric acid (H3BO3) and borax (Na2B4O7.10H2O) while dry seeds and hydropriming were taken as control.