Nagy


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Nagy

(Hungarian nɔdj)
n
(Biography) Imre (ˈimrɛ). 1896–1958, Hungarian statesman; prime minister (1953–55; 1956). He was removed from office and later executed when Soviet forces suppressed the revolution of 1956; reburied with honours in 1989
References in periodicals archive ?
Extending the possibilities that a deeper understanding of resilience might have, the work of Grotberg (1995), (cited in Barnard, Morland, and Nagy, 1999, 57), offered an additional starting point.
At my first lesson, I waited with a mixture of awe and trepidation for Nagy to walk through the door.
Clear and refreshing also describes Nagy's vision of the North American packaged ice industry these days.
The first and most obvious flaw in Thom Nagy's grand plan was a) he had no money, and b) he knew nothing of the book publishing business.
This tattoo builds to an impressive crescendo when the subject of Schaufuss or Nagy is raised, though it should be noted that the decibel count on the Harlech tapometer is generally lower for Nagy.
"The language Hawthorne uses for the novel is his contemporary language--it's also highly formalized, very lush and dense," insists Nagy. "All I tried to do was to mirror him in a technical way, using very contemporary language in the dialogue." And so, Hawthorne's famous characters--Hester Prynne (Cynthia Nixon), the woman guilty of adultery who must wear the scarlet letter "A" on her chest; Arthur Dimmesdale (Stephen Caffrey), the minister who was her secret sexual partner; and Pearl (Erin Cressida Wilson), their seven-year-old daughter--employ a vocabulary infused by 20th-century pop psychology:
The match ended with the result 2:1 on shootouts.Slovak goals were scored by Martin Marinin and Ladislav Nagy.
Nagy, who was accompanied by US Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec, praised Kenya for playing an active role in ensuring peace and stability in the region.
"Asked in a press teleconference how corruption should be addressed in a country such as Kenya, Mr Nagy said graft is "so endemic in so many countries that it really will require a generational shift to wrench it out of the systems."Mr Nagy, a 69-year-old diplomat with wide experience in Africa, added that young Africans are "just sick and tired of what the older generation people my age or even older have been tolerating.
Nagy said it was untenable that there is insufficient capacity in Hungary for the processing of certain products, such as soy, and that the produce cultivated here in Hungary must be repurchased after being processed abroad.
The International Printing and Packaging Company (IPP) will reoffer 10% of its shares in the stock exchange in December, according to a statement by Mustafa Nagy, director of investor relations in the company.