Tate

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Tate

, Nahum 1652-1715.
Irish-born English poet and playwright who wrote a popular adaptation of Shakespeare's King Lear in 1681 and was appointed poet laureate in 1692.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Tate

(teɪt)
n
1. (Biography) (John Orley) Allen. 1899–1979, US poet and critic
2. (Biography) Sir Henry. 1819–99, British sugar refiner and philanthropist; founder of the Tate Gallery
3. (Biography) Nahum (ˈneɪʊm). 1652–1715, British poet, dramatist, and hymn-writer, born in Ireland: poet laureate (1692–1715). He is best known for writing a version of King Lear with a happy ending
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Tate

(teɪt)

n.
1. James, born 1943, U.S. poet.
2. (John Orley) Allen, 1899–1979, U.S. poet and critic.
3. Nahum, 1652–1715, English poet and playwright, born in Ireland: poet laureate 1692–1715.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Noun1.Tate - United States poet and critic (1899-1979)
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References in classic literature ?
His death followed shortly, but meanwhile appeared the Second Part of 'Absalom and Achitophel,' chiefly a commonplace production written by Nahum Tate (joint author of Tate and Brady's paraphrase of the Psalms into English hymn-form), but with some passages by Dryden.]
The right person, however, seemed hard to find, and the laureate of the day, an honest gentleman named Nahum Tate, who could hardly be called a poet, was quite unable for the task.
Her history covers ecocritical big history, the spectacular Jacobean theater, storms of fortune: industrial technology and Nahum Tate 1680-1900, Lear's head: the rise of the psychological metaphor 1908-55, and towards the flood 1962-2016.
(32) Thus began the prologue to Nahum Tate's Brutus of Alba, or The Enchanted Lovers (1678).
It was published as one of 16 hymns by Nahum Tate and Nicholas Brady in the New Version of the Psalms of David.
Like most baroque operas, the source is a classical legend, here the story of Dido and Aeneas from Virgil's "Aeneid." To the well-known tale of Aeneas deserting Dido in order to complete his destiny as the founder of Rome, Purcell and his librettist Nahum Tate added a bizarre group of sorceresses, who, like William Shakespeare's Wyrd Sisters in "Macbeth," usually function as minions of fate.
All that Nahum Tate did in his revision was to return the fable to its hallowed romance roots and its specific sources, after the shock to its system dealt by a perverse dramatist.
In "Secularizing King Lear: Shakespeare, Tate, and the Sacred," Peter Womack tries hard to justify what Nahum Tate did in rewriting Shakespeare's play.
By scaling back the production values to resemble an intimate chamber performance (with Henry Purcell and Nahum Tate's late seventeenth-century opera just beyond its horizon), the musicality of language was this Dido's special effect.
Perhaps this explains a certain sense of homespun charm, as certainly does Nahum Tate's notoriously corny libretto (my favourite line is: 'Our plot has took - the Queen's forsook!').
This Nahum Tate approach to "Lear" is endlessly repeated, but finally creates the show's only genuinely funny moment when Ostrovsky, unable to go through with his straight production of "A Doll House," refuses to let Nora leave, saying: "A Jewish wife does not leave her husband her children.
The Nahum Tate version of King Lear--with the happy ending--held the stage for nearly a century and a half.