nail bed

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nail bed

n.
The formative layer of cells at the base of the fingernail or toenail; the matrix.
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References in periodicals archive ?
As it's the proteins in the nail matrix that create their hardness, your best bet is upping your protein intake.
Only half showed the classic giveaway on the original nail matrix biopsy, consisting of a significantly increased number of atypical melanocytes with marked nuclear atypia.
Friedlander responded, "I think topicals would be great for kids, but it's for kids where there is no nail matrix involvement.
In this procedure, the nail is removed entirely, but the nail matrix is not destroyed.
[15] performed this flap for tip reconstruction in patients with intact nail matrix, but reconstruction was performed for tip closure rather than nail reconstruction as an esthetic unit in both studies.
Nail dystrophy is a nail plate change that results from habitual external trauma to the nail matrix and most often the patient is unaware of this behavior.10 In our study, nail dystrophy was a common manifestation and was seen in 9 (6%) patients.
Regarding the location of the nail pathology, the clinical presentation is different; pitting, leukonychia, red spots in the lunula, nail plate crumbling, beaus lines, and trachyonychia are signs of nail matrix involvement and onycholysis, oil drop discoloration or salmon patch, subungual hyperkeratosis, and splinter hemorrhage indicate nail bed disease.
The final variant is nail lichen striatus, which in addition to cutaneous lesions affects the nail matrix of usually a single digit.
Nail involvement in psoriasis usually is divided into two major groups: (a) signs of involvement of nail matrix including pitting, leukonychia, red spots of the lunula, transverse grooves (Beau's lines), and crumbling of the nail plate and (b) signs of involvement of the nail bed which present as oil-drop discoloration, splinter hemorrhages, subungual hyperkeratosis, and onycholysis [5].
The study author concluded that this positive effect likely resulted from the direct effect of the peptides on the nail matrix. (23)
The condition is caused by increased production of melanin in the nail matrix, which is later deposited in the nail plate (4).
Similarly, anti-cancer drugs, which usually affect rapidly growing cells, including skin, hair follicles and nail matrix are frequently responsible for the dermatological toxicities of chemotherapeutic agents.