Nana Sahib


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Nana Sahib

(ˈnænə ˈsɑːhɪb)
n
(Biography) real name Dandhu Panth. ?1825–?1860, Indian nationalist, who led the uprising at Cawnpore during the Indian Mutiny
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Fresh troops came pouring in, and Nana Sahib made himself scarce over the frontier.
The corridor will connect Gurdwara Darbar Sahib Kartarpur located in Narowal,Pakistan with the shrine of Dera Baba Nana Sahib in Gurdaspur, India.
Following are names of the groups: Dehli Sikh Gurdwara Management Committee, International Bhai Mardana Society Ferozpur, Utter Pradesh Sikh Federation, Khalra Mission Committee Amritsar, SGPC Golden Temple Indian Punjab, United Akali Dal, Nana Sahib Sikh Yatri Jatha and pilgrims from Haryana State.
Deputy Commissioner Aurangzaib Badeni was also briefed regarding price control list by relevant official, adding that an official control price list was issued to respective areas of traders including Tehsil Saranan, Teshil Karizat, Tehsil Barshore, Tehsil Harmzai, Teshil Bostan and Tehsil Nana Sahib for welfare of the citizens.
According to Levies officials, the passenger van came under attack in Nana Sahib area of Balochistan's Loralai district.
Experts believe the treasure may have belonged to Nana Sahib, a landowner who joined the 1857 mutiny against the British.
He handed over the looted gold to Nana Sahib Dhondu Pant, the adopted son of Maratha Peshwa Baji Rao II and chieftain of Bithur, to hide somewhere.
Nana Sahib had under Dalhousie's Doctrine of Lapse lost his right to an annual pension and had been denied in his appeal to the Court of Directors, this rage at the stoppage of his stipend meant backlash against the British.
As far as Nana Sahib's actions at Cawnpore, they were truly heinous, but certainly no worse than the depredations of Colonel James Neill around Allahabad (prior to Cawnpore, by the way), where whole villages were destroyed and countless men, women and children, rebels and loyals alike, were slaughtered out of hand.
Ward retells the story of his command and how, after a siege of the camp, Nana Sahib, the Mahratta leader, tricked the English soldiers into surrender on the promise of safe conduct and then massacred them.
It is a tale of treachery by Nana Sahib and his henchman, Azimullah Khan, of the inept British order to issue cartridges which had to be greased with pork and/or cow fat (both sacred to Hindu, Brahmin and Moslem soldiers) and an illustration of how thin was the 'Red Line' in support of the East India Company.
The principal suspect in the case of the Cawnpore massacre is Nana Sahib, adopted son of the last peshwa, Baji Rao II, who had been exiled to Bithur near Cawnpore.