Nancy


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Nan·cy

 (năn′sē, näN-sē′)
A city of northeast France east of Paris. The capital of the duchy and region of Lorraine, the city passed to France in 1766. It was heavily bombed in World War II.

nan·cy

 (năn′sē) also nance (năns)
n. pl. nan·cies also nanc·es Offensive Slang
Used as a disparaging term for an effeminate man, especially one who is gay.

[From the name Nancy.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nancy

(ˈnænsɪ)
n, pl -cies
a. an effeminate or homosexual boy or man
b. (as modifier): his nancy ways.
[C20: from the girl's name Nancy]

Nancy

(ˈnænsɪ; French nɑ̃si)
n
(Placename) a city in NE France: became the capital of the dukes of Lorraine in the 12th century, becoming French in 1766; administrative and financial centre. Pop: 107 434 (2006)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Nan•cy

(ˈnæn si; Fr. nɑ̃ˈsi)

n.
a city in NE France. 306,982.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nancy - a city in northeastern France in LorraineNancy - a city in northeastern France in Lorraine
France, French Republic - a republic in western Europe; the largest country wholly in Europe
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

nancy

n, nancy-boy
n (dated esp Brit inf)
(= homosexual)Schwule(r) m
(= softy)Weichling m (pej)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
It was all the greater triumph to Miss Nancy Lammeter's beauty that she looked thoroughly bewitching in that costume, as, seated on the pillion behind her tall, erect father, she held one arm round him, and looked down, with open-eyed anxiety, at the treacherous snow-covered pools and puddles, which sent up formidable splashings of mud under the stamp of Dobbin's foot.
All these thoughts rushed through Miss Nancy's mind, in their habitual succession, in the moments between her first sight of Mr.
There was a buzz of voices through the house, as Miss Nancy entered, mingled with the scrape of a fiddle preluding in the kitchen; but the Lammeters were guests whose arrival had evidently been thought of so much that it had been watched for from the windows, for Mrs.
Nancy, washing dishes at the sink, looked up in surprise.
"Yes, ma'am." Nancy answered cheerfully, but she still continued wiping the pitcher in her hand.
"Nancy,"--Miss Polly's voice was very stern now--"when I'm talking to you, I wish you to stop your work and listen to what I have to say."
The next visit I paid to Nancy Brown was in the second week in March: for, though I had many spare minutes during the day, I seldom could look upon an hour as entirely my own; since, where everything was left to the caprices of Miss Matilda and her sister, there could be no order or regularity.
If th' young gentlemen had been at home, I should a' thought they'd been setting their dogs at her, an' worried her, poor thing, as they did MANY a poor thing's cat; but I haven't that to be feared on now.' Nancy's eyes were better, but still far from well: she had been trying to make a Sunday shirt for her son, but told me she could only bear to do a little bit at it now and then, so that it progressed but slowly, though the poor lad wanted it sadly.
'I've done you a piece of good service, Nancy,' he began: then seeing me, he acknowledged my presence by a slight bow.
'Nancy, my dear,' said the Jew in a soothing manner, 'what do YOU say?'
'That it won't do; so it's no use a-trying it on, Fagin,' replied Nancy.
'And as I don't want 'em to, neither,' replied Nancy in the same composed manner, 'it's rather more no than yes with me, Bill.'