nanometre

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nanometre

(ˈnænəʊˌmiːtə) or

nanometer

n
(Units) one thousand-millionth of a metre. Symbol: nm
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nanometre - a metric unit of length equal to one billionth of a meter
metric linear unit - a linear unit of distance in metric terms
A, angstrom, angstrom unit - a metric unit of length equal to one ten billionth of a meter (or 0.0001 micron); used to specify wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation
micrometer, micron - a metric unit of length equal to one millionth of a meter
Translations
nanométer

nanometre

[ˈnænəʊˌmiːtəʳ] Nnanómetro m
References in periodicals archive ?
One micrometer is one-millionth of a meter, or 1,000 nanometers.
According to computer simulations by physicists at the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, a fantastically tiny squirt gun that can spit liquids a few hundred nanometers ought to work--if it can be built.
Using STEM and EELS together -- STEM for basic atomic structure, EELS for identifying elements -- the chemists could distinguish concentrations of trace elements below 10 parts per million in regions of a specimen only 10 nanometers wide, "which translates to near single-atom sensitivity.
Today, it is generally perceived that sub-25 nanometers is the limit to maximizing the efficiency of the silicon base.
They then etched a thin gold film with lines 300 nanometers wide.
The M2I7-n's positional range of X, Y, and Z is 50 millimeters per axis, its step resolution is 10 nanometer, and its positional repeatability is 170 nanometers.
While directing the spotlight of a laser beam onto single molecules, the researchers found that kinesin actually walks along its protein rail, or microtubule, in discrete little steps of 8 nanometers each.
We call them one-dimensional nanowires because they're small wires, only a few tens of nanometers thick, and because they're nearly one-dimensional structures," says Whitney.
The Encounter-based flow has, to date, produced 150 high-end production ASICs at or below 130 nanometers with all first silicon success, out of which about 30 designs were developed at 90 nanometers.
Already this process has produced glass arrays that pack 30 billion channels, each 33 nanometers in diameter, into a square centimeter of glass, says Ronald J.
Its crosstalk prevention features, coupled with NanoRoute SI aware routing, provide a fast path to GDSII and final design closure at 90 nanometers.