vitamin K

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vitamin K

n.
A fat-soluble vitamin, found in leafy green vegetables and some animal products and produced by intestinal bacteria, that plays an essential role in blood clotting. It exists in two main forms, K1 and K2.

[Abbreviation and partial translation of German K(oagulations)vitamin, coagulation vitamin, clotting vitamin, from Koagulation, coagulation, from Latin coāgulātiō, coāgulātiōn-, from coāgulāre, to curdle, coagulate; see coagulate.]

vitamin K1

n.
1. A yellow viscous oil, C31H46O2, found in leafy green vegetables and used by the body in the synthesis of prothrombin. Also called phylloquinone.
2. A synthetic analog of this vitamin, used in the treatment of some coagulation disorders and to prevent hemorrhagic disease in newborns. In veterinary medicine, it is used as an antidote to poisoning by anticoagulant rodenticides. Also called phytonadione.

vitamin K2

n.
Any of several fat-soluble compounds found in liver and other animal products and in some fermented foods and synthesized in the body by intestinal bacteria. Also called menaquinone.

vitamin K3

n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

vitamin K

n, pl K vitamins
(Elements & Compounds) any of the fat-soluble vitamins, including phylloquinone and the menaquinones, which are essential for the normal clotting of blood
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

vitamin K1


n.
a yellowish, oily, viscous liquid, C31H46O2, that occurs in leafy vegetables, rice, bran, and hog liver or is obtained esp. from alfalfa or putrefied sardine meat or synthesized and that promotes blood clotting by increasing the prothrombin content of the blood. Also called phylloquinone, phytonadione.
[1930–35]

vitamin K2


n.
a light yellow, crystalline solid, C41H56O2, having properties similar to those of vitamin K1.
[1935–40]

vitamin K3


n.
[1955–60]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

vitamin K

Any of a group of vitamins important for normal clotting of the blood. Vitamin K is found in green leafy vegetables, pork, liver, and vegetable oils.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.vitamin K - a fat-soluble vitamin that helps in the clotting of blood
fat-soluble vitamin - any vitamin that is soluble in fats
phylloquinone, phytonadione, vitamin K1 - a form of vitamin K
menadione, vitamin K3 - a form of vitamin K
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Phenolic acids, naphthoquinones, and flavonoids are the main phenolic compounds in fresh Juglans regia L.
A total of 14 classes of secondary metabolites were investigated, viz., alkaloids, anthocyanins, anthraquinones, flavonoids, coumarins, anthracene derivatives, lignans, mono-, sesqui-, and diterpenes, naphthoquinones, saponins, water-soluble tannins, condensed tannins, xanthines, triperpenes and steroids.
Vitamin K is a term of a group of fat-soluble K-vitamins that are also naphthoquinones: Vitamin K or K1(phylloquinone), K2 (menaquinone), and K3 (menadione).Vitamin K1 and K2 are naturally found in our bodies.
Marinone and debromomarinone, antiobioticsesquiterpenoid naphthoquinones of a new structure class from a marine bacterium.
impetiginosus, naphthoquinones, furanonaphthoquinones, anthraquinones, benzoic acid derivatives, benzaldehyde derivatives, iridoids, coumarins, flavonoids, and phenylpropanoid glycosides were isolated and identified (Ueda et al., 1994; Kreher et al., 1988; Pereira et al., 2006; Kim et al., 2007; Awale et al., 2005; Suo et al., 2013).
Therefore, a number of compounds, including flavonoids, iridoids, coumarins, anthraquinone-2-carboxlic acid, cyclopentene derivatives, benzaldehyde derivatives, benzoic acid derivatives, [beta]-lapachone, and quinones, including naphthoquinones, furanonaphthoquinones, and anthraquinones, have been extracted from T.
Shanks, "Fungitoxicity of 1,4 naphthoquinones to Candida albicans and Trichophyton mentagrophytes," Canadian Journal of Microbiology, vol.
Banana peels are rich in phenolic compounds which include hydroxy benzoic acids, benzoquinones, phenyl acetic acids, and acetophenones, in addition to anthraquinones, naphthoquinones, isoflavanoids, and flavonoids, along with lignins, lignans, and tannins [43].
Lichens are sources of phenolic compounds synthesized mainly via the acetate-polymalonate pathway, which yields dibenzofurans, chromones, naphthoquinones, anthrones, anthraquinones, depsones, depsides, and depsidones [3].
vivax [7], numerous publications reported on the antiplasmodial activity of naphthoquinones leading to the development of atovaquone (3, Figure 1), a totally synthetic hydroxy-1,4-naphthoquinone [4].
balsamina and identified, for example, flavonols [2], naphthoquinones [3,4], anthocyanin [5], and several phenolic compounds [6], and have been shown to have beneficial properties, for example, antioxidant [7], antimicrobial [8], antitumor [9,10], antianaphylactic [11], anti-inflammatory [12], antipruritic [13], and antinociceptive [14].