Napoleon III


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Napoleon III

Originally Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte. Known as Louis Napoleon. 1808-1873.
Emperor of the French (1852-1870). A nephew of Napoleon I, he led the opposition to Louis Philippe and became president of the Second Republic (1848-1852). After proclaiming himself emperor (1852), he instituted reforms and rebuilt Paris. His successful imperialist ventures were overshadowed by a failed campaign in Mexico (1861-1867) and the Franco-Prussian War (1870-1871), which resulted in his deposition.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Napoleon III

n
(Biography) full name Charles Louis Napoleon Bonaparte, known as Louis-Napoleon. 1808–73, Emperor of the French (1852–70); nephew of Napoleon I. He led two abortive Bonapartist risings (1836; 1840) and was elected president of the Second Republic (1848), establishing the Second Empire in 1852. Originally successful in foreign affairs, he was deposed after the disastrous Franco-Prussian War
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Napoleon III - nephew of Napoleon I and emperor of the French from 1852 to 1871 (1808-1873)Napoleon III - nephew of Napoleon I and emperor of the French from 1852 to 1871 (1808-1873)
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References in classic literature ?
After them came a long line of artillery; then more cavalry, in splendid uniforms; and then their imperial majesties Napoleon III and Abdul Aziz.
Napoleon III, the representative of the highest modern civilization, progress, and refinement; Abdul-Aziz, the representative of a people by nature and training filthy, brutish, ignorant, unprogressive, superstitious--and a government whose Three Graces are Tyranny, Rapacity, Blood.
The bands struck up, and the brilliant adventurer, Napoleon III., the genius of Energy, Persistence, Enterprise; and the feeble Abdul-Aziz, the genius of Ignorance, Bigotry, and Indolence, prepared for the Forward-- March!
Why was Napoleon III a criminal when he was taken prisoner at Boulogne, and why, later on, were those criminals whom he arrested?
Equally little does this view explain why for several centuries the collective will is not withdrawn from certain rulers and their heirs, and then suddenly during a period of fifty years is transferred to the Convention, to the Directory, to Napoleon, to Alexander, to Louis XVIII, to Napoleon again, to Charles X, to Louis Philippe, to a Republican government, and to Napoleon III. When explaining these rapid transfers of the people's will from from one individual to another, especially in view of international relations, conquests, and alliances, the historians are obliged to admit that some of these transfers are not normal delegations of the people's will but are accidents dependent on cunning, on mistakes, on craft, or on the weakness of a diplomatist, a ruler, or a party leader.
Cypher had the power, in common with Napoleon III. and the goggle-eyed perch, of throwing a film over his eyes, rendering opaque the windows of his soul.
Something there was of Napoleon III., something of Don Quixote, and yet again something which was the essence of the English country gentleman, the keen, alert, open-air lover of dogs and of horses.
So it was that Bert Smallways saw the first fight of the airship and the last fight of those strangest things in the whole history of war: the ironclad battleships, which began their career with the floating batteries of the Emperor Napoleon III in the Crimean war and lasted, with an enormous expenditure of human energy and resources, for seventy years.
1870: Emperor Napoleon III, nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte, was deposed and the Third Republic declared in France.
The pair met for breakfast with officials at the Hotel de Palais, which was built by Napoleon III for his wife Eugenie, at today's G7 summit in Biarritz.
While this angered the lenders, France's Napoleon III (nephew of Napoleon Bonaparte) decided to use the opportunity to invade Mexico in 1861.
In a lightly revised and updated version of her 2013 PhD dissertation at the Courtauld Institute of Art, Thoma looks at the entire corpus of French military painting during the two decades of Napoleon III's martial regime.