Napoleonic


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Na·po·le·on I

 (nə-pō′lē-ən, -pōl′yən) Originally Napoleon Bonaparte. Known as "the Little Corporal." 1769-1821.
Emperor of the French and King of Italy (1804-1814). A brilliant military strategist, he overthrew the French Directory (1799) and proclaimed himself first consul and, later, emperor (1804). His military and political might gripped Continental Europe, but after a disastrous winter campaign in Russia (1812), he was forced to abdicate (1814). Having been exiled to the island of Elba, he escaped, briefly regained power, and was ultimately defeated at Waterloo (1815) and exiled for life to the island of St. Helena. His codification of laws, the Napoleonic Code, still forms the basis of French civil law.

Na·po′le·on′ic (-ŏn′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Napoleonic

(nəˌpəʊlɪˈɒnɪk)
adj
(Historical Terms) relating to or characteristic of Napoleon I or his era
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Na•po•le•on•ic

(nəˌpoʊ liˈɒn ɪk)

adj.
of or pertaining to Napoleon I and, less often, Napoleon III or their dynasties.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Napoleonic - of or relating to or like Napoleon BonaparteNapoleonic - of or relating to or like Napoleon Bonaparte; "Napoleonic Wars"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Napoleonic

[nəˌpəʊlɪˈɒnɪk] ADJnapoleónico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

Napoleonic

[nəˌpəʊliˈɒnɪk] adjnapoléonien(ne)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Napoleonic

adjnapoleonisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

Napoleonic

[nəˌpəʊlɪˈɒnɪk] adjnapoleonico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
The largest of these was the French circle of the Napoleonic alliance, the circle of Count Rumyantsev and Caulaincourt.
Then came the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Wars, and the poets sang new songs.
The Chateau Borel, embowered in the trees and thickets of its neglected grounds, had its fame in our day, like the residence of that other dangerous and exiled woman, Madame de Stael, in the Napoleonic era.
It was only in the execution of his plans that he showed his Napoleonic disregard for human life; and it was precisely herein that I began to fear for the girl I still dared to love.
But, instead, he deliberately threw up the battle with San Jose Interurban and Lake Power, and, apparently defeated, with Napoleonic suddenness struck at Klinkner.
Freddy Dove always covered himself with glory in this part, and "took the stage" with a Napoleonic attitude that brought down the house; for the big-headed boy, with solemn, dark eyes and square brow, was "the very moral of that rascal, Boneyparty," Mother Atkinson said.
Tell him for me that I have quite made up my mind, and that it is certain that a dangerous homicidal lunatic, with Napoleonic delusions, was in his house last night.
It was not over the downfall of the man, but over the defeat of the Napoleonic idea, that they rejoiced, and in this they foresaw for themselves the bright and cheering prospect of a revivified political existence.
In his functions, or in presence of strangers, he never laid aside the majesty that time had impressed upon his person; and the habit of frowning with his heavy eyebrows, contracting the wrinkles of his face, and giving to his eyes a Napoleonic fixity, made his manner of accosting others icy.
She had no Napoleonic dream, and was content to devote herself to the arts of peace.
The little priest watched, like a Napoleonic campaign, the swift precision of her policy for expelling all while banishing none.
And there, under his purple panoply, nose crooked like a Napoleonic eagle and eyes glittering and beady, sat Sol Glenhart.