buspirone

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bu·spi·rone

 (byo͞o-spī′rōn′)
n.
A drug, C21H31N5O2, used in its hydrochloride form to treat anxiety disorders.

[bu(tyl) + spir(ane), compound having two rings that share one atom (from German Spiran, from Latin spīra, coil; see spire2) + -one.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.buspirone - a drug (trade name BuSpar) designed specifically for anxiety
antianxiety drug, anxiolytic, anxiolytic drug, minor tranquilizer, minor tranquilliser, minor tranquillizer - a tranquilizer used to relieve anxiety and reduce tension and irritability
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

buspirone

n buspirona
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Disclosing this on Monday, 26 February at the LDEA headquarters in Sinkor, Monrovia Officer-In-Charge Madam Narol Johnson, disclosed that the two ladies, Cecelia P.Toby, 42, and Florence Washington age 39, were arrested upon their returned from Tanzania with the heroin.
The Prime Minister, on the occasion, directed sports department to immediately renovate Narol Cricket Stadium at Muzaffarabad and install flood lights within two months.
The inventor of this American gastronomic ritual, Nathan Handwerker, was born in 1892 in Narol, a shtetl in Austro-Hungarian Galicia.
Headquartered at Narol Ahmadabad the company operates through four facilities across the country.
Around half the housing demand is in five pockets-Vastral, Gandhinagar, Narol, Nikol and Naroda-due to better infrastructure there.
(3.) See Raoul Narol, "Some Thoughts on Comparative Methods in Cultural Anthropology", Methodology in Social Research, Eds.