narrative

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nar·ra·tive

 (năr′ə-tĭv)
n.
1. A narrated account; a story.
2. The art, technique, or process of narrating: the highest form of narrative.
3.
a. A presentation of real-world events that connects them in a storylike way: "There has been less of a coherent, connected media narrative and more of a kind of episodic focus on events, controversies and gaffes" (Mark Jurkowitz).
b. An explanation or interpretation of events in accordance with a particular theory, ideology, or point of view: the competing narratives of capitalism and Marxism.
adj.
1. Consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story: narrative poetry.
2. Of or relating to narration: narrative skill.

nar′ra·tive·ly adv.

narrative

(ˈnærətɪv)
n
1. an account, report, or story, as of events, experiences, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the narrative the part of a literary work that relates events
3. the process or technique of narrating
adj
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) telling a story: a narrative poem.
5. of or relating to narration: narrative art.
ˈnarratively adv

nar•ra•tive

(ˈnær ə tɪv)

n.
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. the art, technique, or process of narrating.
adj.
3. consisting of or being a narrative: narrative poetry.
4. of or pertaining to narration.
5. representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.
[1555–65; < Latin]
nar′ra•tive•ly, adv.

narrative

  • narratage - The technique of having one character in the role of storyteller or the act of inserting bits of explanation into a narrative.
  • narrative - First an adjective meaning "telling the facts of a story," from Latin narrare, which is also the base of narrate.
  • saga - Old Norse for "narrative."
  • diegesis - The narrative or plot.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of eventsnarrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
tearjerker - an excessively sentimental narrative
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
tall tale - an improbable (unusual or incredible or fanciful) story
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
sob story, sob stuff - a sentimental story (or drama) of personal distress; designed to arouse sympathy
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
nursery rhyme - a tale in rhymed verse for children
Adj.1.narrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a storynarrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story; "narrative poetry"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray

narrative

noun story, report, history, detail, account, statement, tale, chronicle, recital He began his narrative with the day of the murder.

narrative

noun
Translations
رِوائي، قَصَصي
historkanaracenarativnípříběhvyprávěcí
fortælling
jutustus
kertomus
saga, frásögn
物語
breedsprakigspraakzaamverhaalverhalendverslag

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
A. ADJnarrativo
B. N (= act) → narración f; (= story) → narración f, relato m

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
nrécit m
adj [style, poem] → narratif/ive

narrative

n
(= story)Erzählung f; (= account)Schilderung f; (= text)Text m
(= act of narrating)Erzählen nt; (of events, journey)Schilderung f; he has a gift for narrativeer ist ein talentierter Erzähler
adjerzählend; ability etcerzählerisch; narrative poemBallade f; (modern) → Erzählgedicht nt; narrative structureErzählstruktur f

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
1. adjnarrativo/a
2. nnarrazione f; (technique) → narrativa

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
References in classic literature ?
But in Epic poetry, owing to the narrative form, many events simultaneously transacted can be presented; and these, if relevant to the subject, add mass and dignity to the poem.
For of all measures the heroic is the stateliest and the most massive; and hence it most readily admits rare words and metaphors, which is another point in which the narrative form of imitation stands alone.
All the earlier part is a retrospect, in a narrative form, relating to an event which took place about a year before.
There is no need for me to say whether my own opinion does or does not sanction the disclosure of the remarkable family story, of which my narrative forms an important component part.
To some extent Schama was deliberately using narrative as a provocative weapon in his counterblast to French Marxists who had tended to see narrative history as a lightweight exercise in myth-making and avoided it in favour of a more analytical approach: they were bound to be as infuriated by Schama's narrative form as by his anti-Jacobin message.
She reports that all children found the narrative re-tell of a story that they heard in Spanish more difficult, whereas the level of language in the spontaneous narrative (the Frog Story) tended to be much higher, especially in terms of the coherence of narrative form.
In seeking to answer this question, the author examines various theories of what distinguishes narrative form from other modes of discourse.
There's plenty of science here, but in an accessible narrative form that will fascinate readers.
Strengths and challenges are then summarized in narrative form for each institution type.
Given Reed's parodic deconstruction of sacrosanct genres such as the slave narrative and his idiosyncratic approaches to narrative form, his style seems consonant with the type of shift Coleman so lucidly articulates.
And De Bernieres' story, which sprawled all over the Adriatic Sea, not to mention World War II and its aftermath, was undoubtedly a bear to boil down to movie narrative form.
His conclusion was not a happy one for journalists, and it remains particularly difficult--and cautionary--for those who would write in the narrative form.