narrative

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nar·ra·tive

 (năr′ə-tĭv)
n.
1. A narrated account; a story.
2. The art, technique, or process of narrating: the highest form of narrative.
3.
a. A presentation of real-world events that connects them in a storylike way: "There has been less of a coherent, connected media narrative and more of a kind of episodic focus on events, controversies and gaffes" (Mark Jurkowitz).
b. An explanation or interpretation of events in accordance with a particular theory, ideology, or point of view: the competing narratives of capitalism and Marxism.
adj.
1. Consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story: narrative poetry.
2. Of or relating to narration: narrative skill.

nar′ra·tive·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

narrative

(ˈnærətɪv)
n
1. an account, report, or story, as of events, experiences, etc
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the narrative the part of a literary work that relates events
3. the process or technique of narrating
adj
4. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) telling a story: a narrative poem.
5. of or relating to narration: narrative art.
ˈnarratively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nar•ra•tive

(ˈnær ə tɪv)

n.
1. a story or account of events, experiences, or the like, whether true or fictitious.
2. the art, technique, or process of narrating.
adj.
3. consisting of or being a narrative: narrative poetry.
4. of or pertaining to narration.
5. representing stories or events pictorially or sculpturally: narrative painting.
[1555–65; < Latin]
nar′ra•tive•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

narrative

  • narratage - The technique of having one character in the role of storyteller or the act of inserting bits of explanation into a narrative.
  • narrative - First an adjective meaning "telling the facts of a story," from Latin narrare, which is also the base of narrate.
  • saga - Old Norse for "narrative."
  • diegesis - The narrative or plot.
Farlex Trivia Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.narrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of eventsnarrative - a message that tells the particulars of an act or occurrence or course of events; presented in writing or drama or cinema or as a radio or television program; "his narrative was interesting"; "Disney's stories entertain adults as well as children"
tearjerker - an excessively sentimental narrative
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
tall tale - an improbable (unusual or incredible or fanciful) story
folk tale, folktale - a tale circulated by word of mouth among the common folk
sob story, sob stuff - a sentimental story (or drama) of personal distress; designed to arouse sympathy
fairy story, fairy tale, fairytale - a story about fairies; told to amuse children
nursery rhyme - a tale in rhymed verse for children
Adj.1.narrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a storynarrative - consisting of or characterized by the telling of a story; "narrative poetry"
communicatory, communicative - able or tending to communicate; "was a communicative person and quickly told all she knew"- W.M.Thackeray
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

narrative

noun story, report, history, detail, account, statement, tale, chronicle, recital He began his narrative with the day of the murder.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

narrative

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
رِوائي، قَصَصي
historkanaracenarativnípříběhvyprávěcí
fortælling
jutustus
kertomus
saga, frásögn
物語
breedsprakigspraakzaamverhaalverhalendverslag

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
A. ADJnarrativo
B. N (= act) → narración f; (= story) → narración f, relato m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
nrécit m
adj [style, poem] → narratif/ive
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

narrative

n
(= story)Erzählung f; (= account)Schilderung f; (= text)Text m
(= act of narrating)Erzählen nt; (of events, journey)Schilderung f; he has a gift for narrativeer ist ein talentierter Erzähler
adjerzählend; ability etcerzählerisch; narrative poemBallade f; (modern) → Erzählgedicht nt; narrative structureErzählstruktur f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

narrative

[ˈnærətɪv]
1. adjnarrativo/a
2. nnarrazione f; (technique) → narrativa
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

narrate

(nəˈreit) verb
to tell (a story). He narrated the events of the afternoon.
narˈration noun
narrative (ˈnarətiv) noun
a story. an exciting narrative.
narˈrator noun
1. a person who tells a story.
2. a person who tells you what is happening or explains something in a film.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
But in Epic poetry, owing to the narrative form, many events simultaneously transacted can be presented; and these, if relevant to the subject, add mass and dignity to the poem.
For of all measures the heroic is the stateliest and the most massive; and hence it most readily admits rare words and metaphors, which is another point in which the narrative form of imitation stands alone.
During the first three days, I finished turning my old diary into this narrative form; it only required a chapter or so to bring it down to date.
All the earlier part is a retrospect, in a narrative form, relating to an event which took place about a year before.
In short, our most successful escapades would prove the greatest weariness of all in narrative form; and none more so than the dull affair of the Ardagh emeralds, some eight or nine weeks after the Milchester cricket week.
There is no need for me to say whether my own opinion does or does not sanction the disclosure of the remarkable family story, of which my narrative forms an important component part.
The nominations/recommendations should contain all relevant details in a specified format, including a citation in narrative form (maximum 800 words), clearly bringing out the achievements of the person.
Love and Narrative Form in Toni Morrison's Later Novels.
Lauren's story is written in narrative form whilst Sierra's side is conveyed through free verse passages interspersed throughout the narrative.
'As energy through a narrative form, it slowly creeps down, then it becomes a part of you.'
In her second novel, Bone Deep, we have a story of secrets told in a dual narrative form from the perspectives of the two main characters - Mac, a woman trying to hide the past from her son and younger woman Lucie, who is trying to escape mistakes from her past.
Jean Wyatt's Love and Narrative Form in Toni Morrison's Later Novels is a much-needed contribution to Morrison studies because it focuses on the formal properties of Morrison's works and because it adds to the sparse criticism on the later novels, including the most recent, God Help the Child (2015).