Nasiriyah

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Na·si·ri·yah

 (nä′sĭ-rē′ə)
A city of southeast Iraq west-northwest of Basra. A strategic crossing on the Euphrates River, it was the site (March 2003) of one of the first major battles of the Iraq War.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nasiriyah

(ˌnæzɪˈriːə)
n
(Placename) a city in S Iraq, on the River Euphrates; agricultural and trading centre. Pop: 425 000 (2005 est)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
New York: Harper, 2008, p.408.) During his brief tenure in Iraq, with a view to identifying Iraqis to play interim roles, Jay Garner, leader of the Organization for Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance (ORHA) hosted two "big-tent" meetings of Iraqi expats and community leaders, on April 15, 2003, in Nasariyah, and on April 28, 2003, in Baghdad.
And 28 people were killed in Nasariyah, 200 miles south east of Baghdad.
The Committee asked about her capture in An Nasariyah, on March 23,2003, the mission conducted to rescue her from the Saddam Hussein General Hospital on April 1, 2003, and the accounts of her actions that were widely circulated in the days after these incidents.
He notes with frustration that, in dialogues with Iraqi opinion leaders in Tikrit, Baghdad, Basra, Nasariyah and Hilla, he found himself explaining American positions regarding transitional procedures that were less democratic than those preferred by his Iraqi interlocutors.
That's because of our people and the technological skills that they bring, and the attributes of warfighting that will never change that manifest themselves daily at Balad and at Bagram and at Kandahar and al Nasariyah, and as personified by Technical Sgt.
The initial wake-up call in Iraq came at An Nasariyah in March 2003 with the heavily reported ambush of the 507th Maintenance Company.
In Nasariyah, southern Iraq, a badly burned boy was airlifted to hospital by an RAF crew after he fell into a fire.
Italian troops also came under attack in Nasariyah yesterday, killing 15 militiamen who used women and children as human shields while trying to gain control of three vital bridges.
Italian intelligence reports say that an Ansar Al Islam member helped organise the truck bombings of the headquarters of the Italian military contingent in Nasariyah, southern Iraq, in November.
Due in part to the capture of soldiers from the 507th Maintenance Company in the city of An Nasariyah and the large number of enemy attacks on coalition forces convoys, the 82d Airborne Division and the 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault) were assigned the mission to secure the lines of communication along key routes running north toward Baghdad.
In large parts of the country in the north and south the population is well-disposed to the Coalition and those areas are relatively free of such attacks, though there have been horrific bombings in Mosul, Hajaf and, yesterday, in Nasariyah.
In an interview with ABC television the 20-year-old also spoke about the nine days she spent in hospital in Nasariyah after her unit was ambushed and she was injured.