Naskapi


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Related to Naskapi: Montagnais and Naskapi

Nas·ka·pi

 (năs′kə-pē)
n. pl. Naskapi or Nas·ka·pis
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting northern Quebec and Labrador.
2. The variety of Montagnais spoken by the Naskapi.

[French, of Montagnais origin.]

Naskapi

(nəˈskæpɪ)
n
(Peoples) a member of an Innu people living in Quebec
[from Cree]
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References in periodicals archive ?
This Policy will also apply to consultations with Aboriginal organizations asserting land claims in Labrador which have not been accepted for negotiation by NL, namely the NunatuKavut Community Council, Naskapi Nation of Kawawachikamach, and the Innu communities of Matimekush-Lac John, Uashat mak Mani-Utenam, Ekuanitshit, Nutakuan, Unamen Shipu and Pakua Shipi.
Au stade de l'elaboration du Plan Nord, ce sont les conseils de bandes et les conseils tribaux des quatre nations Cri, Inuit, Naskapi et Innu qui ont ete invites a participer a deux tables de concertation, celle des partenaires et celle des partenaires autochtones (72).
All of this territory bears aboriginal title--Cree, Inuit, Naskapi, Attikamek and Innu.
Hunters in the barrens; the Naskapi on the edge of the white man's world.
36) Georg Henriksen, Hunters in the Barrens: The Naskapi on the Edge of the White Man's World (St.
While the normal size of the initial edition of a book is no more than 2,000 copies, the call for reprints is still rewarding--one book, Georg Henriksen's Hunters of the Barrens: The Naskapi on the Edge of the White Man's World (1973), had reached 14 reprints by 2007, and approximately 15,000 copies have been sold.
Predictors of educational attainment among Naskapi adolescents.
Thus the major obligation of an individual Naskapi is to follow the instructions given by his dreams, and then to give permanent form to their contents in art.
The New Testament is now available in the Naskapi language, the fruit of 25 years of translation work by Silas Nabinicaboo, a lay reader of the aboriginal church in Kawawachikamach, diocese of Quebec, and Bill Jancewicz, an American translator associated with the Wycliffe Bible Translators.
It should be noted that in autumn 2006, several Committee members had met with the members of the Inuit, Naskapi, Innu, Cree, Algonquin and Huron communities during study missions in Northern Quebec, in the Abitibi-Temiscamingue region and in Wendake.
In the American chapter, Matthews discusses, in varying degrees of depth, the Naskapi of Quebec and Labrador, the Powhatans of Virginia, the Cherokee, the Aztecs, and the Incas.