natural killer cell

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natural killer cell

n.
A large granular lymphocyte that kills virus-infected, cancerous, or abnormal cells without first having been exposed to specific antigens and that also produces a variety of cytokines. Also called NK cell.

nat′ural kill′er cell`


n.
a small killer cell that destroys virus-infected cells or tumor cells without activation by an immune system cell or antibody. Compare killer T cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a study published in Nature Communications, researchers at Karolinska Institutet and Duke-NUS Medical School show that so-called natural killer cells were especially active shortly after an infection.
SLAMF7 also is expressed on Natural Killer cells, plasma cells and at lower levels on specific immune cell subsets of differentiated cells within the hematopoietic lineage.
INmune Bio announced that the peer-reviewed open access scientific journal PLOS ONE published an article titled: "Tumor- and cytokine-primed human natural killer cells exhibit distinct phenotypic and transcriptional signatures," summarizing the different effects between NK cell activation in response to tumor cells and cytokine-mediated activation.
These structurally unrelated forms of HLA class I are known to educate natural killer cells and shape their function.
Prof Lydia Lynch said, 'A compound that can block the fat uptake by natural killer cells might help.
Together, these natural extracts help combat immune senescence by several complementary mechanisms that include enhancing activity of natural killer cells and T cells.
"Natural killer cells are the immune system's most-potent killers, but they are short-lived and cancers manage to evade a patient's own NK cells to progress," says Katy Rezvani, professor of stem cell transplantation and cellular therapy.
5, 2018 (HealthDay News) -- KLRD1-expressing natural killer cells may be a biomarker for influenza susceptibility, according to a study published recently in Genome Medicine.
"We showed that by inhibiting the development of primitive blood we can increase the amount of definitive blood and expand the number of definitive cell types, including red blood cells and immune cells like macrophages and natural killer cells.
It promotes Th1-biased immunity, inducing the activation and proliferation of dendritic cell (DC), B and natural killer cells (NK cells), promoting macrophage M1 polarization and downregulating regulatory T cells.
Larbi, "CD57 in human natural killer cells and T-lymphocytes," Cancer Immunology, Immunotherapy, vol.

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