Nausicaa


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Nau·sic·a·a

 (nô-sĭk′ē-ə, -ā-ə, nou-)
n. Greek Mythology
In the Odyssey, a maiden who befriended the stranded Odysseus.

Nausicaä

(nɔːˈsɪkɪə)
n
(Classical Myth & Legend) Greek myth a daughter of Alcinous, king of the Phaeacians, who assisted the shipwrecked Odysseus after discovering him on a beach
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References in classic literature ?
She went straight to the beautifully decorated bedroom in which there slept a girl who was as lovely as a goddess, Nausicaa, daughter to King Alcinous.
"Nausicaa, what can your mother have been about, to have such a lazy daughter?
By and by morning came and woke Nausicaa, who began wondering about her dream; she therefore went to the other end of the house to tell her father and mother all about it, and found them in their own room.
They pulled without flagging, and carried not only Nausicaa and her wash of clothes, but the maids also who were with her.
When they had done dinner they threw off the veils that covered their heads and began to play at ball, while Nausicaa sang for them.
To this Nausicaa answered, "Stranger, you appear to be a sensible, well-disposed person.
They made Ulysses sit down in the shelter as Nausicaa had told them, and brought him a shirt and cloak.
Meanwhile, Nausicaa bethought her of another matter.
"I am afraid of the gossip and scandal that may be set on foot against me later on; for the people here are very ill-natured, and some low fellow, if he met us, might say, 'Who is this fine-looking stranger that is going about with Nausicaa? Where did she find him?
I lived to watch on a strange shore a black and youthful Nausicaa, with a joyous train of attendant maidens, carrying baskets of linen to a clear stream overhung by the heads of slender palm-trees.
As for Maggie, becoming fascinated, as usual, by a print of Ulysses and Nausicaa, which uncle Pullet had bought as a "pretty Scripture thing," she presently let fall her cake, and in an unlucky movement crushed it beneath her foot,--a source of so much agitation to aunt Pullet and conscious disgrace to Maggie, that she began to despair of hearing the musical snuff-box to-day, till, after some reflection, it occurred to her that Lucy was in high favor enough to venture on asking for a tune.