Navajo

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Nav·a·jo

also Nav·a·ho  (năv′ə-hō′, nä′və-)
n. pl. Navajo or Nav·a·jos also Navaho or Nav·a·hos
1. A member of a Native American people inhabiting extensive reservation lands in Arizona, New Mexico, and southeast Utah. The most populous of contemporary Native American groups in the United States, the Navajo are noted as stockbreeders and skilled weavers, potters, and silversmiths.
2. The Apachean language of the Navajo.

[American Spanish Navajó, originally a place name, from Tewa navahū, large arroyo with cultivated fields.]

Nav′a·jo′ adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

Nav•a•jo

or Nav•a•ho

(ˈnæv əˌhoʊ, ˈnɑ və-)

n., pl. -jos, -joes or -hos, -hoes, (esp. collectively) -jo or -ho.
1. a member of an American Indian people of the U.S. Southwest, now centered on a reservation in NE Arizona and adjacent areas of Utah and New Mexico.
2. the Athabaskan language of the Navajo.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Navajo - a member of an Athapaskan people that migrated to Arizona and New Mexico and UtahNavajo - a member of an Athapaskan people that migrated to Arizona and New Mexico and Utah
Athabaskan, Athapascan, Athapaskan, Athabascan - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Athapaskan language and living in the subarctic regions of western Canada and central Alaska
2.Navajo - the Athapaskan language spoken by the Navaho
Athabascan, Athapaskan language, Athabaskan, Athapascan, Athapaskan - a group of Amerindian languages (the name coined by an American anthropologist, Edward Sapir)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
navajo
References in periodicals archive ?
Inevitably, they took Route 66 heading for the Grand Canyon, pictured above, and onwards to Indian settlements at Monument Valley which features paintings by Navahos, Dinosaur footprints embedded in the rocks and even a skeleton.
* In the spring of 1864 the Navahos were relocated to Fort Sumner.
Maybe it was the influence of Clint Eastwood as the cheroot chewing stranger with no name that sparked this curious look that had school girls the country over looking like knee high Navahos and dinky desperados.
I believe that it is very important to make sure that at least a small number of talented Navahos develop more than the average skill in reading and recording Navaho material.
David Bell, the protagonist of Americana, buries himself in a sacramental journey in quest of the spiritual meaning of the Navahos, but ends up filming misfits in Fort Curtis.
For one thing, according to Abraham, the Navahos eat no beef, but they do consume a lot of mutton.
As Aberle admits, "Among the Navahos, my role as an earnest seeker after truth was never accepted" (p.
Six years spent among the Navahos resulted in numerous papers and books.
The Navahos express their intense religious feeling in long chants, usually parallel in structure.