nave

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nave

the center part of a church
Not to be confused with:
knave – unprincipled, dishonest person; villain
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree
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nave1
plan of the 4th-century ad
St. Peter's Basilica, Rome
Italy
A. apse
B. transept
C. nave
D. aisles
E. narthex
F. atrium

nave 1

 (nāv)
n.
The central part of a church, typically extending from the narthex to the chancel and flanked by aisles.

[Medieval Latin nāvis, from Latin, ship (from its shape); see nāu- in Indo-European roots.]

nave 2

 (nāv)
n.
The hub of a wheel.

[Middle English, from Old English nafu; see nobh- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

nave

(neɪv)
n
(Architecture) the central space in a church, extending from the narthex to the chancel and often flanked by aisles
[C17: via Medieval Latin from Latin nāvis ship, from the similarity of shape]

nave

(neɪv)
n
the central block or hub of a wheel
[Old English nafu, nafa; related to Old High German naba]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

nave

(neɪv)

n.
the principal longitudinal area of a church, extending from the main entrance or narthex to the chancel.
[1665–75; < Medieval Latin nāvis, Latin: ship]

nave

(neɪv)
n.
the central part of a wheel; hub.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English nafu, nafa, c. Middle Dutch nave, Old High German naba, Old Norse nǫf; akin to navel]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.nave - the central area of a churchnave - the central area of a church  
area - a part of a structure having some specific characteristic or function; "the spacious cooking area provided plenty of room for servants"
church building, church - a place for public (especially Christian) worship; "the church was empty"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
صَحْن الكَنيسَه
hlavní loď
midterskib
fõhajó
kirkjuskip
nava
joms
hlavná loď
sahın

nave

1 [neɪv] N (Archit) → nave f

nave

2 [neɪv] N (= wheel) → cubo m
nave plate (Aut) → tapacubos m inv
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

nave

[ˈneɪv] nnef f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

nave

n
(of church)Haupt- or Mittel- or Längsschiff nt
(of wheel)(Rad)nabe f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

nave

[neɪv] n (of church) → navata centrale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

nave

(neiv) noun
the middle or main part of a church.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
There are, invariably, two naves, which intersect in a cross, and whose upper portion, rounded into an apse, forms the choir; there are always the side aisles, for interior processions, for chapels,--a sort of lateral walks or promenades where the principal nave discharges itself through the spaces between the pillars.
The charioteers standing on their well-woven cars, urged on their swift horses with loose rein; the jointed cars flew along clattering and the naves of the wheels shrieked loudly.
Overhead, Handel's March swelled pompously through the imitation stone vaulting, carrying on its waves the faded drift of the many weddings at which, with cheerful indifference, he had stood on the same chancel step watching other brides float up the nave toward other bridegrooms.
In the valley beneath lay the city they had just left, its more prominent buildings showing as in an isometric drawing--among them the broad cathedral tower, with its Norman windows and immense length of aisle and nave, the spires of St Thomas's, the pinnacled tower of the College, and, more to the right, the tower and gables of the ancient hospice, where to this day the pilgrim may receive his dole of bread and ale.
There was every walk and nook which Alice had made glad; and in the minster nave was one flat stone beneath which she slept in peace.
Little by little, all noises were extinguished, like the lamps illuminating the humble nave. The minister bowed for the last time to the altar and the still fresh graves; then, followed by his assistant, he slowly took the road back to the presbytery.
The interval passed, and the married couple, returning to the church, walked together down the nave to the door.
And beyond the circle of light, in the soft darkness of the nave, the silent people kneel or stand to watch.
There was no one even to tell her which, of all the sepulchral slabs that paved the nave and transepts, was the one that was really beautiful, the one that had been most praised by Mr.
The eyes of Porthos were furtively cast upon this lady, and then roved about at large over the nave.
Paul’s, now that we nave got it on end, is a great help to the navigation of the woods, for, by the Lord Harry!
In fact, the Prince of Conde was attentively scrutinizing these two images of desolation, standing like caryatides on either side of the nave of the church.