navigability

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nav·i·ga·ble

 (năv′ĭ-gə-bəl)
adj.
1. Sufficiently deep or wide to provide passage for vessels: navigable waters; a navigable river.
2. Capable of being steered. Used of boats, ships, or aircraft.

nav′i·ga·bil′i·ty, nav′i·ga·ble·ness n.
nav′i·ga·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.navigability - the quality of being suitable for the passage of a ship or aircraft
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
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References in classic literature ?
A succession of navigable waters forms a kind of chain round its borders, as if to bind it together; while the most noble rivers in the world, running at convenient distances, present them with highways for the easy communication of friendly aids, and the mutual transportation and exchange of their various commodities.
In all the parts of the world washed by navigable waters our relation to each other would be the same--and more intimate than there are words to express in the language.
Further, protections under the Canadian Navigable Waters Act (currently the Navigation Protection Act) will be expanded to better protect the right to travel on all navigable waters in Canada, covering countless rivers, lakes and other waterways.
To protect navigable waters, the Clean Water Act's jurisdiction extends to waters linked to navigable ones.
The Coast Guard is reminding Alaska boaters that Alaska House Bill 132, otherwise known as the Let's Ride Alaska Act, that brings ridesharing services such as Uber and Lyft to Alaska roadways, does not pertain to navigable waters of Alaska.
It focused on drinking water safety and protection of navigable waters.
In his executive order, Trump said, "It is in the national interest to ensure that the nation's navigable waters are kept free from pollution, while at the same time promoting economic growth, minimizing regulatory uncertainty, and showing due regard for the roles of the Congress and the states under the Constitution.
and that the final rule contained some provisions related to allowable distances from navigable waters that were not included in the proposed rule, so those provisions were not subject to public comments.
and that the final rule contained some provisions related to allowable distances from navigable waters which were not included in the proposed rule, so those provisions were not subject to public comments.
The EPA always believed its jurisdiction stretched beyond traditional navigable waters such as rivers and seas to the smaller bodies of water and wetlands that can affect them, but it didn't have a strong legal basis to prove it.
In a change from the proposed rule, the agencies in the final rule also assert jurisdiction over wetlands adjacent to tributaries of navigable waters for the first time by defining how far they are located from a navigable water or its tributary.