Navigation Acts


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Navigation Acts

pl n
1. (Law) a series of acts of Parliament, the first of which was passed in 1381, that attempted to restrict to English ships the right to carry goods to and from England and its colonies. The attempt to enforce the acts helped cause the War of American Independence
2. (Historical Terms) a series of acts of Parliament, the first of which was passed in 1381, that attempted to restrict to English ships the right to carry goods to and from England and its colonies. The attempt to enforce the acts helped cause the War of American Independence
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The more recent economic losses in Darien, the Jacobite fighting, the famine of 'King William's Dear Years' and the suppression of trade by the Navigation Acts all made Scotland ripe for picking, but a point of the Act was to remove the divide between Scotland and England that had given centuries of war, and redefine the country as a Great Britain made up of North and South Britain to show the new beginning of a settled partnership.
history, but that the mercantilist trade policies of the British Empire--such as the Navigation Acts, which precluded direct trade between the American colonies and other countries and required all goods be channeled through England--contributed to the growing anti-Crown fervor that eventually erupted into revolution and the birth of a nation.
forfeiture provisions in English law appeared in the Navigation Acts,
Due to restrictions on shipping under the Navigation Acts and the East India Company's trade monopoly, American merchant ships and privateers smuggled in much of the Asian goods found in the colonies.
Starting with the mercantilist principles of Adam Smith and the conflict between free trade and the 'notoriously restrictive' Navigation Acts regulating national shipping, it finishes with the internationalism of the truly global, post-regulatory era.
The underlying thesis of The Capital and the Colonies is that the growth of English colonial trade and shipping in the Atlantic between 1660 and 1700 can not entirely be explained by the effects of the Navigation Acts, as Lawrence Harper and others have contended, but attention to the development of "commercial capabilities" that allowed England "to improve efficiency, close a substantial cost gap with its Dutch rivals and make mercantilism work" (p.
The debate over the Navigation Acts during the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia in 1774 was one such moment.
To Adam Smith (1776), these Navigation Acts were "impertinent badges of slavery, imposed ...
The Navigation Acts (1651, 1660, and 1663) were enacted to enforce mercantilist policy by protecting British and colonial trade from competition.
He arrived as captain of HMS Boreas in 1785 and spent two years enforcing Britain's Navigation Acts which were intended to keep her colonies trade exclusive to the mother country.
The Navigation Acts would follow, as would religious regulations that called for moral reformation and the abolition of episcopacy in favor of sectarian toleration.
Implicit taxes took the form of the Navigation Acts, which sought to regulate shipping between the colonies and its trading partners.