Nazarite


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Related to Nazarite: Nazarene

Nazarite

(ˈnæzəˌraɪt)
n
(Bible) another word for Nazarene1, Nazarene2

Nazarite

(ˈnæzəˌraɪt) or

Nazirite

n
(Historical Terms) a religious ascetic of ancient Israel
[C16: from Latin Nazaraeus, from Hebrew nāzīr, from nāzar to consecrate + -ite1]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
"Is he a modern Nazarite or a Hebrew prophet left over from olden times?" asked Anne.
"The Suspected Adulteress and the Nazarite (Numbers 5:11-6:21)," Jewish Law Association Studies 23, 49-62.
He will live as a Nazarite (see Numbers 6) - a person set apart for the Lord.
said unto her, There has not come a razor upon mine head; for I have been a Nazarite unto God...: If I be shaven, then my strength will go...
(10) The Nazarite matrons' IsiZulu represents the first-ever true "uniformization" of one regional variant of twentieth century Zulu speakers' folk attire.
(13) Dreadlocks are part of the Nazarene tradition, biblically inclined following the Nazarite vow (Lev.
In refusing the invitation Bassanio's dinner party, he insists he will not "eat of the habitation which your prophet the Nazarite conjured the devil into!" (1.3.31-32).
HALKIN INTERLACES JABOTINSKY'S thrilling life with a discussion of the ideas found in his speeches, essays, polemics, and especially his many novels, like 1927's Samson the Nazarite, a retelling of the biblical story in which Samson is portrayed as a free spirit who is called to refashion the Jews into a disciplined martial force.
Zulu prophet Isaiah Shembe (1869-1935) was a messianic figure who led a Nazarite movement.
Concerning the demands of James and all the elders to fulfill the rite and pay for the sacrifices, scholars believe that the mandated rite is of the Nazarite. In fact, the reader has been warned that few months ahead Paul shaved his head "because he was under a vow." Howard Clark Kee states that "if Paul was to participate in this kind of ascetic rite, the charge by his opponents that he ignored the Law and its provisions for purity would be dramatically refuted." (125) This 'refutation' serves as an act of resistance of double entendre: at the same time that he proves allegiance to his ancestral faith, it is a rebuke to the Jewish-Christian in Jerusalem for not understanding the time of her visitation.
The biblical Samson, we remember, was born to be a "nazarite"; in ancient Hebrew the word means "one separated." Now at his death, however, the only way to "separate" Samson from his Philistine enemies and thus remove him from a history of reciprocal violence that blurs the moral distinction between hostile parties is to find and clean his body.
* On Wednesday evening Jonie Barrett presided and David McEvoy spoke on Law of the Nazarite.