Nebuchadnezzar


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Nebuchadnezzar

(ˌnɛbjʊkədˈnɛzə)
n
(Brewing) a wine bottle, used esp for display, holding the equivalent of twenty normal bottles (approximately 520 ounces)
[C20: named after Nebuchadnezzar2, from the custom of naming large wine bottles after Old Testament figures; compare jeroboam]

Nebuchadnezzar

(ˌnɛbjʊkədˈnɛzə) or

Nebuchadrezzar

n
(Bible) Old Testament a king of Babylon, 605–562 bc, who conquered and destroyed Jerusalem and exiled the Jews to Babylon (II Kings 24–25)
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

Neb•u•chad•nez•zar

(ˌnɛb ə kədˈnɛz ər, ˌnɛb yʊ-)

n.
1. Also, Neb`u•chad•rez′zar (-ˈrɛz ər) died 562? b.c., king of Babylonia 605?–562? B.C.: conqueror of Jerusalem. II Kings 24, 25.
2. (sometimes l.c.) a bottle for wine holding 20 quarts (18.9 liters).
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Nebuchadnezzar - (Old Testament) king of Chaldea who captured and destroyed Jerusalem and exiled the Israelites to Babylonia (630?-562 BC)Nebuchadnezzar - (Old Testament) king of Chaldea who captured and destroyed Jerusalem and exiled the Israelites to Babylonia (630?-562 BC)
Old Testament - the collection of books comprising the sacred scripture of the Hebrews and recording their history as the chosen people; the first half of the Christian Bible
2.nebuchadnezzar - a very large wine bottle holding the equivalent of 20 normal bottles of wine; used especially for display
wine bottle - a bottle for holding wine
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

Nebuchadnezzar

[ˌnebjʊkədˈnezəʳ] NNabucodonosor
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
For truth and falsehood, in such things, are like the iron and clay, in the toes of Nebuchadnezzar's image; they may cleave, but they will not incorporate.
"Behold Nebuchadnezzar!" exclaimed an old Puritan soldier, whose eyes flashed at the sight of the man they called the tyrant.
"Do you call him Nebuchadnezzar?" said Mordaunt, with a terrible smile; "no, it is Charles the First, the king, the good King Charles, who despoils his subjects to enrich himself."
I'm in what I call THE stage, and all I desire is a listener, although he were deaf, to be as happy as Nebuchadnezzar.'
Now, D'Artagnan, when he left Calais with his ten scamps, would have hesitated as little in attacking a Goliath, a Nebuchadnezzar, or a Holofernes as he would in crossing swords with a recruit or caviling with a landlady.
But we did not take much further interest in the green growth, for one cannot live on grass like Nebuchadnezzar. That requires a special dispensation of Providence and peculiar digestive organs.
As my bricks had been in a chimney before, though I did not read the name of Nebuchadnezzar on them, I picked out its many fireplace bricks as I could find, to save work and waste, and I filled the spaces between the bricks about the fireplace with stones from the pond shore, and also made my mortar with the white sand from the same place.
This is what makes my blood tingle." And he turned over the pages of his Bible and read, "Shadrach, Meshach, and Abed- nego answered and said to the king, O Nebuchadnezzar, we are not careful to answer thee in this matter.
'faux air' of Nebuchadnezzar in the fields about you, that is certain: your hair reminds me of eagles' feathers; whether your nails are grown like birds' claws or not, I have not yet noticed."
Little Boy was second, while there was a two and a half length gap to Lorraine Sams's Nebuchadnezzar in third.
Drawing on the methodology established for earlier studies of court litigation procedure in Mesopotamian history--i.e., classification of cuneiform litigation records and attention to legal terminology as the basis for description of the adjudicatory process--Holtz (Yeshiva U.) surveys the adjudicatory procedures found in the records of the Neo-Babylonian period (employing a broad use of the term that includes texts that date to the reign of the Babylonian Kings from Nebuchadnezzar II onwards to Darius II and the earlier Achaemenid emperors).
THE BRITISH MUSEUM'S exhibition Babylon: Myth And Reality provides a penetrating flash of insight to the ancient city during the reign of King Nebuchadnezzar II (605-562 BC), its contribution to science and mathematics and the art, films and music it inspired.