Negro spiritual


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Negro spiritual

(ˈniːɡrəʊ)
n
(Music, other) a type of religious song originating among Black slaves in the American South
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Noun1.Negro spiritual - a kind of religious song originated by Blacks in the southern United States
religious song - religious music for singing
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
negro-spiritual
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References in periodicals archive ?
His New World Symphony (1893) includes fragments and echoes of some of these folksongs, for example, "Swing Low, Sweet Chariot," "Yankee Doodle," and "Peter Gray." According to Sigmund Spaeth (A History of Popular Music in America, 1948), William Arms Fisher turned the Largo of the symphony into a song called "Goin' Home" (1922), "now widely accepted as an authentic Negro spiritual, even though entirely the work of two white men." Then in 1934, Billy Hill and Peter De Rose built a song hit, "Wagon Wheels," on "Goin' Home" and "Swing Low." Dvorak's popular <IR> HUMORESQUE </IR> , written for the violin, was used by Fannie Hurst as the title of her short story by that name (1919), and the story later was made into a movie (1920).
When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last!
"' Arthur instantly broke into song again, this time a Negro spiritual.
"When we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, Black men and White men, Jew and Gentile, Protestant and Catholic, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the Negro spiritual - Free at last!
IT'S easy to be cynical about 750,000 people lining London's streets to sing a negro spiritual anthem to cauliflower-eared giants and a golden eggcup.
The lyrics - based on a negro spiritual song - were found in a letter sent by celebrated Coventry poet Larkin to an old schoolfriend in 1943.
On April 20, 1925, the music critic of the New York Times wrote: "His Negro Spirituals...hold in them a world of religious experience; it is their cry from the depths, this universal humanism, that touches the heart...Sung by one man, they voiced the sorrow and hopes of a people." My father went on to establish the Negro Spiritual for the first time as an accepted art form on the American concert stage.
There was also a collection of Sketches on Negro Spiritual Songs, written by the Hungarian AntalffyZsiross after his move to the US.
And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when&nbsp;all&nbsp;of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual:
As the old negro spiritual puts it: 'Nobody knows the traboules I've seen'.
(13.) Recent scholarship exploring the roots of the Negro Spiritual tradition has uncovered a deep source of this tradition in West African music and culture (Maultsby 185).
And when this happens, and when we allow freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual: