cousin

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cous·in

 (kŭz′ĭn)
n.
1. A child of one's aunt or uncle. Also called first cousin.
2. A relative descended from a common ancestor, such as a grandparent, by two or more steps in a diverging line.
3. A relative by blood or marriage; a kinsman or kinswoman.
4. A member of a kindred group or country: our Canadian cousins.
5. Something similar in quality or character: "There's no mistaking soca for its distant Jamaican cousin, reggae" (Michael Saunders).
6. Used as a form of address by a sovereign in addressing another sovereign or a high-ranking member of the nobility.

[Middle English cosin, a relative, from Old French, from Latin cōnsōbrīnus, cousin : com-, com- + sōbrīnus, cousin on the mother's side; see swesor- in Indo-European roots.]

cous′in·hood′ n.
cous′in·ly adj.
cous′in·ship′ n.

cousin

(ˈkʌzən)
n
1. Also called: first cousin, cousin-german or full cousin the child of one's aunt or uncle
2. a relative who has descended from one of one's common ancestors. A person's second cousin is the child of one of his parents' first cousins. A person's third cousin is the child of one of his parents' second cousins. A first cousin once removed (or loosely second cousin) is the child of one's first cousin
3. a member of a group related by race, ancestry, interests, etc: our Australian cousins.
4. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a title used by a sovereign when addressing another sovereign or a nobleman
[C13: from Old French cosin, from Latin consōbrīnus cousin, from sōbrīnus cousin on the mother's side; related to soror sister]
ˈcousinˌhood, ˈcousinˌship n
ˈcousinly adj, adv

Cousin

(French kuzɛ̃)
n
(Biography) Victor (viktɔr). 1792–1867, French philosopher and educational reformer

cous•in

(ˈkʌz ən)

n.
1. the son or daughter of an uncle or aunt.
2. one related by descent in a diverging line from a known common ancestor.
3. a kinsman or kinswoman; relative.
4. a person or thing related to another by similar natures, languages, geographical proximity, etc.
5. a term of address used by a sovereign for another sovereign or a high-ranking noble.
[1250–1300; Middle English cosin < Anglo-French co(u)sin, Old French cosin < Latin consōbrīnus cousin (properly, son of one's mother's sister) =con- con- + sōbrīnus second cousin (presumably orig. “pertaining to the sister”) <*swesrīnos=*swesr-, gradational variant of *swesōr (>soror sister) + *-īnos -ine1]
cous′in•ly, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cousin - the child of your aunt or uncle
relative, relation - a person related by blood or marriage; "police are searching for relatives of the deceased"; "he has distant relations back in New Jersey"
Translations
إبْن أو بِنت العم أو العمّـهاِبْنُ العَمِّ
bratranecsestřenice
kusinefætter
kuzo
serkkusukulainenpikkuserkku
bratić
unokatestvér
frændi eîa frænka
いとこ
사촌
antros eilės pusbrolisantros eilės pusseserėpusbrolispusseserė
brālēnsmāsīca
bratranecsesternica
bratranecsestrična
kusin
ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง
kuzenerkek yeğen
anh em họ

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] Nprimo/a m/f
first cousinprimo/a m/f carnal
second cousinprimo/a m/f segundo/a

cousin

[ˈkʌzən] ncousin(e) m/f first cousin, second cousin

cousin

n (male) → Cousin m, → Vetter m (dated); (female) → Cousine f, → Kusine f, → Base f (old); Kevin and Susan are cousinsKevin und Susan sind Cousin und Cousine

cousin

[ˈkʌzn] ncugino/a

cousin

(ˈkazn) noun
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
first/full cousin
a son or daughter of one's uncle or aunt.
second cousin
a child of one's parent's first cousin or a child of one's first cousin.

cousin

اِبْنُ العَمِّ bratranec kusine Cousin ξάδελφος primo serkku cousin bratić cugino いとこ 사촌 neef fetter kuzyn primo двоюродный брат kusin ลูกพี่ลูกน้อง kuzen anh em họ 堂表兄弟姊妹

cousin

n. primo-a.

cousin

n primo -ma mf
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