nematocyst

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nem·a·to·cyst

 (nĕm′ə-tə-sĭst′, nĭ-măt′ə-)
n.
A capsule within specialized cells in the tentacles of cnidarians, such as jellyfish and corals, containing a barbed, threadlike tube that delivers a toxic sting to predators and prey.

nem′a·to·cys′tic adj.

nematocyst

(ˈnɛmətəˌsɪst; nɪˈmætə-)
n
(Zoology) a structure in coelenterates, such as jellyfish, consisting of a capsule containing a hollow coiled thread that can be everted to sting or paralyse prey and enemies
ˌnematoˈcystic adj

nem•a•to•cyst

(ˈnɛm ə təˌsɪst, nɪˈmæt ə-)

n.
one of the tiny organs in jellyfish and other coelenterates that uncoils a threadlike poisonous stinger when irritated.
[1870–75]
nem`a•to•cys′tic, adj.

nem·a·to·cyst

(nĕm′ə-tə-sĭst′, nĭ-măt′ə-sĭst′)
One of the stinging cells in the tentacles of a jellyfish, hydra, or related animal, used to capture prey and ward off attackers.
References in periodicals archive ?
Andy Snider, curator of herps and aquatics at Brookfield Zoo, explains that all jellies have tentacles with stinging cells called nematocysts.
Evaluation of the effects of various chemicals on discharge of and pain caused by jellyfish nematocysts.
The ability of aeolids to retain nematocysts from their cnidarian prey for defence is mentioned on pages 12, 29, 30 and 204.
Use a razor blade, credit card or shell to remove any nematocysts (small poisonous sacs) stuck to the skin.
lactea cnidome (the set of nematocysts of a species) is well-known (Morandini & Marques, 2010) although there are no toxicological studies for this species.
Contact with a tentacle can prompt millions of nematocysts to pierce the skin (or gums) and inject venom, causing varying degrees of pain and swelling.
Several studies suggest that vinegar can counter the effects of the venomous nematocysts that a jellyfish releases during an attack.
These soft-bodied sea anemones provide a unique habitat for anemonefishes, which are protected from piscivorous fishes by the anemones' nematocysts.
It is armed only by absorbing nematocysts, which are stinging cells borrowed from the hydra, and emigrating them to its ectoderm.
Do you see a pattern of how the nematocysts are distributed?
Sea anemones' poisonous nematocysts have small trigger hairs on the tentacles' surface.
Remember, a lot of the stinging nematocysts have been "knocked out" by the vinegar.