neoclassicism

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Related to Neo Classicism: Neoclassicism art

ne·o·clas·si·cism

also Ne·o·clas·si·cism  (nē′ō-klăs′ĭ-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A revival of classical aesthetics and forms, especially:
a. A revival in literature in the late 1600s and 1700s, characterized by a regard for the classical ideals of reason, form, and restraint.
b. A revival in the 1700s and 1800s in architecture and art, especially in the decorative arts, characterized by order, symmetry, and simplicity of style.
c. A movement in music lasting roughly from 1915 to 1940 that sought to avoid subjective emotionalism and to return to the style of the pre-Romantic composers.
2. Any of various intellectual movements that embrace a set of traditional principles regarded as fundamental or authoritative.

ne′o·clas′sic, ne′o·clas′si·cal adj.
ne′o·clas′si·cist n.

neoclassicism

(ˌniːəʊˈklæsɪˌsɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a late 18th- and early 19th-century style in architecture, decorative art, and fine art, based on the imitation of surviving classical models and types
2. (Classical Music) music a movement of the 1920s, involving Hindemith, Stravinsky, etc, that sought to avoid the emotionalism of late romantic music by reviving the use of counterpoint, forms such as the classical suite, and small instrumental ensembles
ˌneoˈclassicist n
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neoclassicism - revival of a classical style (in art or literature or architecture or music) but from a new perspective or with a new motivation
artistic style, idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
arts, humanistic discipline, humanities, liberal arts - studies intended to provide general knowledge and intellectual skills (rather than occupational or professional skills); "the college of arts and sciences"
Translations

neoclassicism

[ˈniːəʊˈklæsɪsɪzəm] Nneoclasicismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
Neo Classicism is very much alive in Munich, the heritage of Ludwig I having experienced a phoenix-like rebirth from the ashes of World War II.
Sculptures were the chief desiderata and beside them, engraved gems, here given their due (they were disgracefully omitted from the Europe wide Neo Classicism exhibition in 1973, even from the Grand Tour exhibition itself, which featured just three gems--next to Reynolds's painting of 1777 in which a group of Dilettanti show off their trophy intaglios!)
The early eighteenth century house was altered for Marigny in 1768-71 by Souffiot, who designed the new courtyard facade in an interesting Palladian variant of early neo classicism. Soon after wards, in 1773, Marigny decided to sell the lease and to spend more time at the fourth of his properties, the Chateau de Menars.