neocolonialism

(redirected from Neo colonialism)
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ne·o·co·lo·ni·al·ism

 (nē′ō-kə-lō′nē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
The policy or practice of a wealthy or powerful nation in extending its influence into a less developed one, especially in exploiting that nation's resources.

ne′o·co·lo′ni·al adj.
ne′o·co·lo′ni·al·ist n.

neocolonialism

(ˌniːəʊkəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) (in the modern world) political control by an outside power of a country that is in theory sovereign and independent, esp through the domination of its economy
ˌneocoˈlonial adj
ˌneocoˈlonialist n

ne•o•co•lo•ni•al•ism

(ˌni oʊ kəˈloʊ ni əˌlɪz əm)

n.
the policy by which a nation exerts political and economic control over a less powerful independent nation or region.
[1960–65]
ne`o•co•lo′ni•al, adj., n.
ne`o•co•lo′ni•al•ist, n., adj.

neocolonialism

domination of a small or weak country by a large or strong one without the assumption of direct government. — neocolonialist, n., — neocolonial, adj.
See also: Politics
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.neocolonialism - control by a powerful country of its former colonies (or other less developed countries) by economic pressures
colonialism - exploitation by a stronger country of weaker one; the use of the weaker country's resources to strengthen and enrich the stronger country
Translations

neocolonialism

[ˌniːəʊkəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzəm] Nneocolonialismo m

neocolonialism

[ˌniːəʊkəˈləʊnɪəˌlɪzm] nneocolonialismo
References in periodicals archive ?
He argued: "In order to halt foreign interference in the affairs of developing countries it is necessary to study, understand, expose and actively combat neo colonialism in whatever guise it may appear.
The group also denounced the presence of the United Nations mission in the country, claiming its presence was part of neo colonialism.
Whichever way one analyzes it; neo colonialism resulted in the exploitation of the African states such that the foreign capital entering the state to foster development instead "promoted" underdevelopment (Nkrumah, 1975: 415).