Neo-Lamarckism


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Related to Neo-Lamarckism: Lamarck theory

Ne·o-La·marck·ism

 (nē′ō-lə-mär′kĭz′əm)
n.
A theory of the late 1800s and early 1900s, based on Lamarckism, that adaptive characteristics acquired by an organism during its lifetime could be inherited by its offspring.

Ne′o-La·marck′i·an (-mär′kē-ən) adj. & n.

Neo-Lamarckism

(ˌniːəʊləˈmɑːkɪzəm)
n
(Biology) a theory of evolution based on Lamarckism, proposing that environmental factors could lead to adaptive genetic changes
ˌNeo-Laˈmarckian adj, n

Neo-Lamarckism

a modern theory based on Lamarckism that states that acquired characteristics are inherited. — Neo-Lamarckian, n., adj.
See also: Evolution
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Neo-Lamarckism - a modern Lamarckian theory emphasizing the importance of environmental factors in genetic changes and retaining the notion of the inheritance of acquired characters
Lamarckism - a theory of organic evolution claiming that acquired characteristics are transmitted to offspring
References in periodicals archive ?
The arguments over neo-Lamarckism in the late nineteenth century are perhaps even more complex than Glendening allows: while the idea of inheriting adaptive characteristics could be seen as offering promise of progress over generations, it also underpins a fear of the acquisition of negative characteristics (criminality, insanity, moral decline) that was particularly pronounced in the late nineteenth century.
Especially important were neo-Lamarckism and the creative evolutionism of Bergson, which offered liberal thinkers hope that evolution could be divested of materialistic implications.