Neo-Latin


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Related to Neo-Latin: New Latin

Neo-Latin

(ˌniːəʊˈlætɪn)
n
(Languages) another term for New Latin
adj
1. (Languages) denoting or relating to New Latin
2. (Linguistics) denoting or relating to language that developed from Latin; Romance

New′ Lat′in


n.
the Latin of literature and learned writing from c1500 to the present, including the Greco-Latin taxonomic nomenclature of biology. Abbr.: NL
[1885–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Neo-Latin - Latin since the RenaissanceNeo-Latin - Latin since the Renaissance; used for scientific nomenclature
Latin - any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
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References in periodicals archive ?
Among the topics are from the Dome of the Chain to Mihrab Da'ud: the transformation of an Umayyad commemorative site at the Haram al-Sharif in Jerusalem, an Italian Renaissance gate for the Khan: visual culture in early modern Crimea, a missing royal mosque in Istanbul that Islamized a Catholic space: the Galata New Mosque, Adham Isma'il's Arabesque: the making of a radical Arab painting in Syria, (re)writing the early biography of the Alhambra's Fountain of Lions: new evidence from a neo-Latin poem of 1497, and between Istanbul and Gujarat: descriptions of Mecca in the 16th-century Indian Ocean.
NLN is the official publication of the American Association for Neo-Latin Studies.
Synopsis: Famous for his "Book of the Courtier", Baldassarre Castiglione also composed works in neo-Latin that have never been the subject of systematic, critical scrutiny within the broader context of early Cinquecento court culture.
His interests include both the Roman novel and Neo-Latin literature.
There was much discussion of commentaries written between 1450 and 1700 at the 15th International Conference of the International Association for Neo-Latin Studies held in 2012.
He is primarily concerned with vernacular poetry although he touches on the neo-Latin poetry that was produced by the official court poets Henry VII introduced to his court as he reshaped it to be that of a Renaissance prince.
Sources and Influences' look at the role of the Bible, classical literature and philosophy, history, Chaucer and the mediaeval romance, neo-Latin literature, sixteenth century poetics, and Italian as well as French literature.
Jacopo Sannazaro (1456-1530) is arguably the most admired of the neo-Latin poets of the Renaissance.
Julianne Bruneau's essay offers a reading of the female figure of Natura in Allan of Lille's Complaint of Nature, for example, and Jennifer Morrish considers female characters in Johannes Praschius' neo-Latin novel Psyche Cretica.
The name is from the neo-Latin scientific name Falco subbuteo, a bird of prey commonly known as the Eurasian hobby, after a trademark was not granted to call the game Hobby.
Stephan Fussel examines the origins and spread of printing and Wilhelm Kuhlmann analyses the literature written in neo-Latin from the late fifteenth to the early eighteenth century in Germany, much of which was read by intellectuals across Europe.
Along with the elegy, which it resembles to a large extent through meter (all thirteen epistles of book 1 are in elegiac couplets, though the six poems of book 2 are in hexameters), length, and content, the epistle was a very popular genre in the first part of the sixteenth century in both Neo-Latin and French vernacular literature.